Lie Down in Darkness

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Penguin Publishing Group, Apr 1, 1978
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User Review  - abbeyhar - LibraryThing

This could have been a novella, Styron kinda beats everybody over the head with the story, and the repetitiveness of some of the themes. Some parts were very moving and most of it was well written, but you could tell twere his first book. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - abbeyhar - LibraryThing

This could have been a novella, Styron kinda beats everybody over the head with the story, and the repetitiveness of some of the themes. Some parts were very moving and most of it was well written, but you could tell twere his first book. Read full review

Contents

Section 1
5
Section 2
64
Section 3
142
Copyright

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About the author (1978)

William Clark Styron was born in Newport News, Virginia on June 11, 1925. He attended Duke University and took courses at the New School for Social Research in New York City, which started him on his writing career. He was a Marine lieutenant during World War II and while serving during the Korean War, was recalled from active duty because of faulty eyesight. After leaving the service, he helped start a magazine called the Paris Review and remained as an advisory editor. His first novel, Lie Down in Darkness, was published in 1951. His other books include The Long March and Set This House on Fire. He won several awards including the Pulitzer Prize for The Confessions of Nat Turner and the American Book Award for Sophie's Choice, which was made into a movie in 1982. His short story, A Tidewater Morning, was the basis for the movie Shadrach, which Styron wrote the screenplay for with his daughter. He also wrote several nonfiction books including The Quiet Dust and Other Writings and Darkness Visible: A Memoir of Madness. He died on November 1, 2006 at the age of 81.

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