A glossary and etymological dictionary: of obsolete and uncommon words, antiquated phrases, and proverbs illustrative of early English literature, comprising chiefly those not to be found in our ordinary dictionaries; with historical notices of ancient customs and manners

Front Cover
T. Bennett, 1834 - Reference - 467 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 41 - All murder'd : for within the hollow crown That rounds the mortal temples of a king Keeps Death his court, and there the antic sits, Scoffing his state and grinning at his pomp...
Page 130 - I know each lane, and every alley green, Dingle, or bushy dell, of this wild wood, And every bosky bourn from side to side, My daily walks and ancient neighbourhood...
Page 294 - What hands are here? ha! they pluck out mine eyes! Will all great Neptune's ocean wash this blood Clean from my hand? No; this my hand will rather The multitudinous seas incarnadine, Making the green one red.
Page 17 - ... were made in England, show us here The mettle of your pasture ; let us swear That you are worth your breeding : which I doubt not; For there is none of you so mean and base, That hath not noble lustre in your eyes. I see you stand like greyhounds in the slips,* Straining upon the start. The game's afoot ; Follow your spirit : and, upon this charge, Cry — God for Harry ! England ! and Saint George ! [Exeunt . Alarum, and Chambers go off.
Page 108 - I'll tent him to the quick: if he but blench, I know my course.
Page 31 - The eternal regions. Lowly reverent Towards either throne they bow, and to the ground With solemn adoration down they cast Their crowns inwove with amarant and gold ; Immortal amarant, a flower which once In Paradise, fast by the tree of life, Began to bloom...
Page 400 - To sit at the table above or below the salt was a mark of distinction in opulent families. The salt was contained in a massive silver utensil called a saler, now corrupted into cellar, which was placed in the middle of the table ; persons of distinction sat nearest the head of the table, or above the salt, and inferior relations or dependants below it. Page 193, line 1 ; NEWES FROM THE CHURCH]. In the sixth edition this is subscribed "Jo. Ruddiard.
Page 400 - Then fly, false thanes, And mingle with the English epicures: The mind I sway by and the heart I bear Shall never sag with doubt nor shake with fear.
Page 90 - Now, now the mirth comes, With the cake full of plums, Where beane's the king of the sport here ; Beside we must know, The pea also Must revell as queene in the court here.
Page 204 - Harmonious numbers; as the wakeful bird Sings darkling, and in shadiest covert hid Tunes her nocturnal note.

Bibliographic information