Proceedings of the Royal Physical Society of Edinburgh, Volume 7

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Page 262 - ... when the usual form of a river is considered, the trunk divided into many branches, which rise at a great distance from one another, and these again subdivided into an infinity of smaller ramifications, it becomes strongly impressed upon the mind, that all these channels have been cut by the waters themselves; that they have been slowly dug out by the washing and erosion of the land; and that it is by the repeated touches of the same instrument, that this curious assemblage of lines has been...
Page 262 - The changes which have taken place in the courses of rivers, are also to be traced, in many instances, by successive platforms, of flat alluvial land, rising one above another, and marking the different levels on which the river has run at different periods of time.
Page 4 - ... which Nature has chiefly selected to record the history of the former changes of the globe. There is scarcely any great series of strata that does not contain some marine or fresh-water shells.
Page 61 - Mucrochcilus, was originally described* by the late Professor Phillips, for a series of thick, smooth, subglobose or oval shells with convex whorls, and an oval aperture, the columella flattened, imperforate, and with an obtuse revolving fold. Six species are known from the Carboniferous series of North Britain. One or two of these appear to vary to that extent that it is difficult to determine where the one begins and the other ends. One very well-marked character appears to exist throughout the...
Page 154 - ... Where the brown duck strips her breast, For her dear eggs and windy nest, Three times her bitter spoil is won For woman ; and when all is done She calls her snow•white piteous drake, Who plucks his bosom for our sake." There is truth in these lines every one. In' our own country the birds breed along the shores of the Firth of Forth, as well as in the Orkneys and Shetlands ; on Colonsay and Islay it also abounds, and less frequently in many other northern breeding stations. It is in still more...
Page 49 - Canada, under the name of Naiadites, on specimens obtained from the Coal Measures of the South Joggins, Nova Scotia. The affinity of these shells has been discussed by Dr Dawson at some length. He considers them to be brackish-water shells, allied to the Mytilidce, or embryonic forms of Unionidae, and states that the structure of the shell is similar to that of the latter family. || There is an internal lamellar layer, a subnacreous layer of vertical prismatic shell, and an epidermis ; an external...
Page 129 - Carboniferous Formation," etc. He gives here a very good description of the barren fronds ; and in regard to the fertile it is stated that " each of the small obtuse teeth or indentations on the borders of the lobes has, at the top of one or two of the veinlets, small round elevated dots, which, when seen with a glass, appear like sori. I consider them as fructifications, comparable, by their position at least, to the fruit-dots of some Davallice of our time...
Page 264 - He supposed them to be the vnngs — as he phrased it — of successive deltas raised and intersected one after another as the land, stage by stage, arose from the sea. This view has been widely accepted. It differs from Darwin's only in assuming intermittent elevation. With some modification it was this view that was taken by the uniformitarian school during the controversy respecting the palaeolithic terrace-gravels of the Somme Valley and Southern England.
Page 72 - ... not been specially constructed for them. On the whole it may be safely said that the best museums of natural history established in the United Kingdom are rather in advance of than behind the majority of continental institutions of the same rank. X. — Notes on the Genera of Gasteropod Mollusca from the Carboniferous Limestone Series of the Central and Western Coal-Fields of Scotland.
Page 13 - but too imperfect to be referred to any known species." The object of Mr Peach's first visit to the storm-bound coast of Sutherlandshire appears to have been to inspect a wreck, and to this unfortunate occurrence we are indebted for the important discoveries which followed. || The first shell found was a Maclurea, the same fossil we have seen playing an important part in Girvan conchology. To this were subsequently added many others, all tending to prove, on critical examination by our old friend...

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