Transactions of the Horticultural Society of London, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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The Society, 1820 - Floriculture
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Page iii - Philadelphia, be, and shall be, for ever hereafter, persons able and capable in law, to sue and be sued, plead and be impleaded, answer and be answered unto, defend and be defended...
Page 10 - Spain ; but as it would take some time to introduce them into use in that country, and afterwards to make the Italians so well acquainted with them as to give them a name,* there is every reason to believe they had been several years in Europe, before they were sent to CLUSIUS.
Page vii - ... other bye-laws as they shall think most useful and expedient, so that the same be not repugnant to these presents, or to the laws and statutes of this our Realm...
Page x - Society answerable, for the certainty of the facts, or propriety of the reasonings, contained in the several Papers so published, - which must still rest on the credit or judgment of their respective Authors.
Page 207 - I the most favourable opportunity of cultivating it, although I now venture to lay the following account before the Horticultural Society. Horseradish thrives best in deep, soft, sandy loam, that is not very dry in summer, nor inundated in winter ; the situation must be open. Trench...
Page 147 - Entelle, tuae praeferet ille domus. invida purpureos urat ne bruma racemos et gelidum Bacchi munera frigus edat, condita perspicua vivit vindemia gemma et tegitur felix nee tamen uva latet: femineum lucet sic per bombycina corpus, calculus in nitida sic numeratur aqua, quid non ingenio voluit natura licere?
Page 38 - I have been able to draw in the course of many years close attention to the subject on which I write. New varieties of every species of fruit will generally be better obtained by introducing the farina of one variety of fruit into the blossom of another, than by propagating from any single kind. When an experiment of this kind is made, between varieties of different size and character, the farina of the smaller...
Page i - FIFTH, by the Grace of God, of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and of the British Dominions beyond the Seas King, Defender of the Faith, to all to whom these Presents shall come, GREETING ! Whereas...
Page 208 - EE bottom, upon which plant a row of sets across the bed, at nine inches apart each way, with their crowns upright ; afterwards dig the next trench the same width and depth, turning the earth into the first trench over the row of sets: thus proceeding, trench after trench, to the end. Where more than the produce of one bed is required for the supply of the family for twelve months, the third bed is next to be...
Page 31 - Rhine, and the other on those of the Nile, each would adapt its habits to the climate in which it were placed ; and if both were subsequently brought, in early spring, into a climate similar to that of Italy, the plant which had adapted its habits to a cold climate would instantly vegetate, whilst the other would remain perfectly torpid. Precisely the same thing occurs in the hot-houses of this country, where a plant accustomed to the temperature of the open air will vegetate strongly in December,...

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