50 Self-Help Classics: 50 Inspirational Books to Transform Your Life from Timeless Sages to Contemporary Gurus

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Nicholas Brealey Publishing, Dec 7, 2010 - Self-Help - 312 pages
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Thousands of books have been written offering the 'secrets' to personal fulfillment and happiness: how to walk The Road Less Traveled, Win Friends and Influence People, or Awaken the Giant Within. But which are the all-time classics? Which ones really can change your life? Bringing you the essential ideas, insights and techniques from 50 legendary works from Lao-Tzu to Benjamin Franklin to Paulo Coelho, 50 Self-Help Classics is a unique guide to the great works of life transformation.
 

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User Review  - beefriendly - LibraryThing

This is such a helpful book, giving a short but precise overview of all the main works of that field. Great cross-reference for similar books, more lists in back. Excellent summaries to each title ... Read full review

Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction
James Allen As a Man Thinketh 1902
The New Technology of Achievement 1994
How to Claim the Life You Were Meant to Live 2001
The BhagavadGita
The Bible
Robert Bly Iron John 1990
Making Sense of Lifes Changes 1980
The New Mood Therapy 1980
Dale Carnegie How to Win Friends and Influence People 1936
Paulo Coelho The Alchemist 1993
The Psychology of Optimal Experience 1990
Creating Miracles in Everyday Life 1992 22 Ralph Waldo Emerson SelfReliance 1841

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About the author (2010)


Tom Butler-Bowdon is an expert on the “literature of possibility”, covering self-help, motivation, spirituality, prosperity, psychology and philosophy. USA Today described him as “a true scholar of this type of literature”. His first book, 50 SELF-HELP CLASSICS, won the Benjamin Franklin Award and was a Foreword magazine Book of the Year. The 50 CLASSICS series has sold over 300,000 copies and has been published in 23 languages.

A graduate of the London School of Economics and the University of Sydney, he lives in Oxford, UK, and Australia.

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