Sumerian Epic of Paradise, the Flood and the Fall of Man, Volume 10, Issues 1-4

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University Museum, 1919 - Assyro-Babylonian literature - 98 pages
 

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Page 44 - When the woman saw that the tree was good for eating and a delight to the eyes, and that the tree was desirable as a source of wisdom, she took of its fruit and ate. She also gave some to her husband, and he ate.
Page 30 - Noricus deterret ensis nec mare naufragum nec saevus ignis nec tremendo luppiter ipse ruens tumultu. fertur Prometheus addere principi limo coactus particulam undique desectam et insani leonis vim stomacho apposuisse nostro. irae Thyesten exitio gravi stravere et altis urbibus ultimae stetere causae, cur perirent funditus imprimeretque muris hostile aratrum exercitus insolens.
Page 116 - Offspring of a king, clad upon by a true form. 1 7. Offspring of an high-priest whose head is crowned. 1 8. Thy high-priest is the lord of the deep, the divine king who within the sanctuary of heaven dwells. 19. Thy king is the great mountain father Enlil. 20. Like a wall he turns back for thee the wicked ones(?), father of all lands. 21. The Anunnakki, the great gods, 22. Within thee Kenurra5 inhabited. 23. In thy great dark chambers they feed. 1 Sumer is here employed in its original signification,...
Page 84 - My brother, what of thee is ill?" 28. "My herd is ill." 29. "The goddess 'Queen of the herd'1 have I brought forth for thee." 30. "My brother, what of thee is ill?" "My face is ill." 31. "The goddess Ninkautu have I brought forth for thee." 32. "My brother, what of thee is ill?" "My mouth is ill." 33. "The goddess 'Queen who fills the mouth'2 have I brought forth for thee." 34. "My brother, what of thee is ill?
Page 62 - ... tablet which forms the subject of this volume proves the profundity of their [ie, ' the theologians of Nippur'] thinking in the region of ethics and philosophy. We venture to think that no document has yet been recovered from the ruins of the past to which such a volume of influence can be traced [upon] our own civilization for the immense period of four thousand years. The great Hebrew documents which propound the harassing problem of the origin of human sorrows, would have been impossible without...
Page 82 - For su-ut in the sense of id est, "that is," see CT. 17, 42, 13, dNintud lu-ut dMaŁ, "Nintud, that is Mah." 6 With this passage compare Genesis 6, 6: "And Jahweh repented that he had made man on the earth and he was vexed in his heart.
Page 62 - ... timely reminder that the complete meaning of the old myths has not been found, though the more external aspects have been recognised, identified, and explained. Dr. Langdon remarks : " The tablet which forms the subject of this volume proves the profundity of their [ie, ' the theologians of Nippur'] thinking in the region of ethics and philosophy. We venture to think that no document has yet been recovered from the ruins of the past to which such a volume of influence can be traced [upon] our...
Page 149 - That the rich man may not do whatsoever is in his heart, that one man to another do not anything disgraceful, 2. Wickedness and hostility he destroyed justice he instituted.
Page 6 - In a long address to her consort, Ninella glorifies the land of Dilmun, praising its peace and bliss. And all things were so. But for some reason which is all too briefly defined, Enki, the god of wisdom, became dissatisfied with man and decided to overwhelm him with his waters. This plan he revealed to Nintud, the earth mother goddess, who with the help of Enlil, the earth god, had created man. According to one passage Nintud under the title Ninhursag assisted in the destruction of humanity.
Page 6 - And all things were so. But for some reason which is all too briefly defined Enki the god of wisdom became dissatisfied with man and decided to overwhelm him with his waters. This plan he revealed to Nintud the earth mother goddess, who with the help of Enlil the earth god had created man. According to Col. II 32 Nintud under the title Ninharsag assisted in the destruction of humanity. For nine months the flood endured and man dissolved in the waters like tallow and fat. But Nintud had planned to...

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