The Black Death of 1348 and 1349

Front Cover
G. Bell, 1908 - Black Death - 272 pages
This book offers a highly detailed and thorough history of the Black Death of 1348 and 1349. The book also breaks down the information by country and region, offering a complex view into the differing medical knowledge and treatment of the disease in varying places.?
 

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Contents

I
v
II
xix
III
1
IV
18
V
39
VI
66
VII
81
VIII
106
IX
135
X
149
XI
188
XII
225

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Page 24 - Nor was it given by conversing with only, or coming near the sick, but even by touching their clothes, or anything that they had before touched. It is wonderful what I am going to mention...
Page 85 - twas my father's last bequest. Thus I new-marry him whose wife I am; Death shall not separate us. O, my lords, I but deceived your eyes with antic gesture, When one news straight came huddling on another Of death! and death! and death!
Page 110 - Because by killing of great beasts, &c. from whose putrified blood running down the streets, and the bowels cast into the Thames, the air in the city is very much corrupted and infected, whence abominable and most filthy stinks proceed ; sicknesses, and many other evils have happened to such as have abode in the said city, or have resorted to it...
Page 23 - ... and more numerous, both sorts the usual messengers of death. To the cure of this malady, neither medical knowledge nor the power of drugs was of any effect; whether because the disease was in its own nature mortal, or that the physicians (the number of whom, taking quacks and women pretenders into...
Page ii - BELL AND SONS PORTUGAL ST. LINCOLN'S INN, WC CAMBRIDGE : DEIGHTON, BELL & CO. NEW YORK: THE MACMILLAN CO. BOMBAY: AH WHEELER & CO.
Page 25 - ... better preservative, and would baulk no passion or appetite they wished to gratify, drinking and revelling incessantly from tavern to tavern, or in private houses; which were frequently found deserted by the owners, and therefore common to every one ; yet avoiding, with all this irregularity, to come near the infected.
Page 146 - History and Antiquities of the University of Oxford. Ed. Gutch 1. 449. He says also: "The school doors were shut, colleges and halls relinquished, and none scarce left to keep possession or make up a competent number to bury the dead.
Page 45 - The contagious nature of the disease is indeed the most terrible of all the terrors (of the time), for when anyone who is infected by it dies, all who see him in his sickness, or visit him, or do any business with him, or even carry him to the grave, quickly follow him thither, and there is no known means of protection.
Page 108 - Gloucestershire, and Oxfordshire, and at length came to London, and overspread all England, so wasting the people, that scarce the tenth person of all sorts was left alive, and churchyards were not sufficient to receive the dead, but men were forced to choose out certain fields for burials ; whereupon Ralph Stratford, bishop of London, in the year 1348, bought a piece of ground called No Man's Land...
Page 85 - It passed," writes Robert of Avesbury, the contemporary Registrar of the Court of Canterbury, " most rapidly from place to place, swiftly killing ere mid-day many who in the morning had been well, and without respect of persons (some few rich people excepted), not permitting those destined to die to live more than three, or at most four, days.

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