The beauties of England and Wales: or Delineations, topographical, historical, and descriptive, of each county

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Verner & Hood, 1801 - Architecture
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Page 384 - Wharton, the scorn and wonder of our days, Whose ruling passion was the lust of praise: Born with whate'er could win it from the wise, Women and fools must like him or he dies; Though wondering senates hung on all he spoke, The club must hail him master of the joke.
Page 388 - Of mimic'd statesmen and their merry king. No wit to flatter left of all his store! No fool to laugh at, which he valued more. There, victor of his health, of fortune, friends, And fame, this lord of useless thousands ends.
Page 385 - Grown all to all, from no one vice exempt, And most contemptible, to shun contempt; His passion still, to covet general praise, His life, to forfeit it a thousand ways; A constant bounty which no friend has made; An angel tongue, which no man can persuade; A fool, with more of wit than half mankind, Too rash for thought, for action too refined...
Page 51 - Yet within three days shall Pharaoh lift up thy head from off thee, and shall hang thee on a tree ; and the birds shall eat thy flesh from off thee.
Page 388 - ... In the worst inn's worst room, with mat half-hung, The floors of plaster, and the walls of dung,, On once a flock-bed, but repair'd with straw, With tape-tied curtains, never meant to draw, The George and Garter dangling from that bed, Where tawdry yellow strove with dirty red, Great Villiers lies — alas ! how chang'd from him, That life of pleasure, and that soul of whim...
Page 391 - Poets, indeed, profess fiction ; but the legitimate end of fiction is the conveyance of truth ; and he that has flattery ready for all whom the vicissitudes of the world happen to exalt, must be scorned as a prostituted mind, that may retain the glitter of wit, but has lost the dignity of virtue.
Page 296 - And you, brave COBHAM ! to the latest breath, Shall feel your ruling passion strong in death : Such in those moments as in all the past ; " Oh, save my country, Heaven !
Page 333 - The sloping land recedes into the clouds; Displaying on its varied side the grace Of hedge-row beauties numberless, square tower, Tall spire, from which the sound of cheerful bells Just undulates upon the listening ear; Groves, heaths, and smoking villages remote.
Page 356 - I am persuaded his power and interest at that time were greater to do good or hurt than any man's in the kingdom, or than any man of his rank hath had in any time; for his reputation of honesty was universal, and his affections seemed so publicly guided, that no corrupt or private ends could bias...
Page 296 - Consult the Genius of the Place in all; That tells the Waters or to rise, or fall; Or helps th' ambitious Hill the heavens to scale, Or scoops in circling theatres the Vale; Calls in the Country, catches opening glades, Joins willing woods, and varies shades from shades; Now breaks, or now directs, th' intending Lines; Paints as you plant, and, as you work, designs.

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