Our seamarks; a plain account of the lighthouses, lightships, beacons, buoys, and fog-signals maintained on our coasts for the guidance of mariners

Front Cover
Longmans, Green, 1884 - Beacons - 192 pages
 

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Page 154 - A sailing ship under way shall make with her fog horn, at intervals of not more_ than two minutes, when on the starboard tack one blast, when on the port tack two blasts in succession, and when with the wind abaft the beam three blasts in succession. (c) A steam ship and a sailing ship, when not under way, shall at intervals of not more than two minutes, ring the bell.
Page 155 - It is reported, in old times, upon the saide rock there was a bell, fixed upon a tree or timber, which rang continually, being moved by the sea, giving notice to the saylers of the danger. This bell or clocke was put there and maintained by the Abbot of Aberbrothok, and being taken down by a sea pirate, a yeare therafter he perished upon the same rocke, with ship and goodes, in the righteous judgement of God.
Page 154 - ... to be sounded by a bellows or other mechanical means, and also with an efficient bell. (In all cases where the regulations require a bell to be used, a drum will be substituted on board Turkish vessels.) A sailing.ship shall be provided with a similar fog.horn and bell.
Page 131 - ... 2. The term Starboard Hand shall denote that side which would be on the right hand of the mariner, either going with the main stream of flood or entering a harbour, river, or estuary from seaward ; the term Port Hand shall denote the left hand of the mariner, under the same circumstances.
Page 155 - It is reported in old times upon the saide rock there was a bell, fixed upon 155 a tree or timber, which rang continually, being moved by the sea, giving notice to the saylers of the danger. This bell, or clocke, was put there and maintained by the Abbot of Aberbrothock ; and, being taken down by a sea-pirate, a yeare thereafter he perished upon the same rock, with ship and goodes, in the righteous judgment of God.
Page 132 - Buoys on the same side of a •channel, estuary, or tideway, may be distinguished from each other by names, numbers, or letters, and, where necessary, by a staff surmounted with the appropriate beacon.
Page 25 - Far in the bosom of the deep, O'er these wild shelves my watch I keep; A ruddy gem of changeful light, Bound on the dusky brow of night, The seaman bids my lustre hail, And scorns to strike his timorous. sail.
Page 132 - Port-hand buoys shall be painted of another characteristic colour, either single or parti-colour. " 10. Spherical buoys at the ends of middle grounds shall always be distinguished by horizontal stripes of white colour.
Page 133 - in white letters thereon, and shall exhibit — By day, three balls on a yard 20 feet above the sea, two placed vertically at one end and one at the other, the single ball being on the side nearest the wreck.
Page 54 - I beg to state that, in my opinion, Professor Holmes has practically established the fitness and sufficiency of the magneto-electric light for lighthouse purposes, so far as its nature and management are concerned. The light produced is powerful beyond any other that I have yet seen so applied, and in principle may be accumulated to any degree ; its regularity in the lantern is great ; its management easy, and its care there may be confided to attentive keepers of the ordinary degree of intellect...

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