The British Critic and Quarterly Theological Review, Volume 3

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F. and C. Rivington, 1794
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Page 187 - For the poor shall never cease out of the land : therefore I command thee, saying, Thou shalt open thine hand wide unto thy brother, to thy poor, and to thy needy, in thy land.
Page 285 - I was drawn along the surface of the water in a very agreeable manner. Having then engaged another boy to carry my clothes round the pond, to a place which I pointed out to him on the other side, I began to cross the pond with my kite, which carried me quite over without the least fatigue, and with the greatest pleasure imaginable.
Page 702 - Better is the end of a thing than the beginning thereof: and the patient in spirit is better than the proud in spirit.
Page 668 - And he brought forth the people that were therein, and put them under saws, and under harrows of iron, and under axes of iron, and made them pass through the brickkiln: and thus did he unto all the cities of the children of Ammon.
Page 286 - ... to pay the high prices given in Europe for painting, statues, architecture, and the other works of art that are more curious than useful. Hence the natural geniuses that have arisen in America, with such talents, have uniformly quitted that country for Europe, where they can be more suitably rewarded.
Page 189 - I look upon all that has passed as one of those romantic dreams which opium commonly occasions ; and I do by no means desire to repeat the nauseous dose, for the sake of the fugitive dream.
Page 20 - Where we have no doubt, we ought not to put the parties to the delay and expence of a further argument; nor leave other persons, who may be interested in the determination of a point so general, unnecesunnecessarily under the anxiety of suspense*.
Page 285 - ... round the pond, to a place which I pointed out to him on the other side, I began to cross the pond with, my kite, which carried me quite over without the least fatigue, and with the greatest pleasure imaginable. I was only obliged occasionally to halt a little in my course, and resist its progress, when it appeared that, by following too quick, I lowered the kite too much ; by doing which occasionally...
Page 285 - ... ignorance, mistaken ideas and expectations of what is to be obtained there ; he thinks it may be useful, and prevent inconvenient, expensive and fruitless removals and voyages of improper persons, if he gives some clearer and truer notions of that part of the world than appear to have hitherto prevailed.
Page 155 - Require the borrow'd gloss of art ? Speak not of fate : ah ! change the theme, And talk of odours, talk of wine, Talk of the flowers that round us bloom : 'Tis all a cloud, 'tis all a dream ; To love and joy thy thoughts confine, Nor hope to pierce the sacred gloom.

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