Theory of heat

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For J. & J. J. Deighton, 1837 - 182 páginas
 

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Página 93 - That every species of pure elastic fluid has its particles globular and all of a size ; but that no two species agree in the size of their particles, the pressure and temperature being the same.
Página 8 - But if equal weights or equal bulks of different substances are employed, the result will be different. Thus, if a pint of mercury at 100° be mixed with a pint of water at 40°, the mixture will...
Página 24 - We should find that it is not true that, at all degrees of the thermometer, the loss of heat of a body is proportional to the excess of its temperature above that of the medium in which it is...
Página 4 - In this way each piece is made to indicate its own temperature without possibility of mistake. Liquid Thermometers. In the most common form of thermometer, temperature is measured by the expansion of mercury in glass. On the end of a glass tube of very fine bore, a bulb is blown (see Fig. 1), and the bulb and part of the tube are filled with mercury. The whole is then heated until the mercury completely fills the tube, after which it is sealed and allowed to cool. The space in the tube above the...
Página 28 - ... inclosure ; not merely upon the excess of one of these over the other. And it was found most convenient, first, to make such experiments as should exhibit the dependence of the velocity of cooling upon the temperature of the enclosure ; which dependence is contained in the following law : — The quickness of cooling of a thermometer in vacuo for a constant excess of temperature, increases in geometric progression, when the temperature of the inclosure increases in arithmetic progression. From...
Página 19 - ... Jupiter and Saturn, and, as would seem from recent observations, on that of Mars. It remains to notice one other phenomenon indicative of an atmosphere: a distant spherical body, whether self-luminous or shining by reflected light, would, according to the law that the intensity of the radiation varies as the sine of the angle which the direction of emanation makes with the surface, appear equally bright at all points of the disk. But an atmosphere to the body, of considerable magnitude and constituted...
Página 92 - ... who has elaborately calculated many of their movements, observes, that, " from the experiments and admirable views of Dr. Dalton, we may conclude, that, when different gases are brought together, they will intermingle with each other gradually, offering no other resistance (in the words of Dalton) to the mixture, than the opposition which pebbles present to the motion of water...
Página xiii - I was led to the conclusion that the law of force is that of the inverse square of the distance, and by means of that law was enabled to shew that the vibrations are necessarily transversal.
Página 9 - Petit discovered that the product of the specific heat by the atomic weight is the same for many elementary substances which are found in the solid state at the ordinary temperature.
Página 15 - A mode of loss of heat analogous to conduction, is that to which Dr. Prout has applied the term convection. When a hot body is in contact with the air, the part next the body becoming more elastic (rarefied), flies off and is supplied by colder portions ; thus the heat of the body is conveyed away more rapidly than it would be if the air were not in motion. It is obvious that this circumstance will materially affect all experiments on the motion of heat, in which it is hardly possible to estimate...

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