Writing and Developing Your College Textbook: A Comprehensive Guide to Textbook Authorship and Higher Education Publishing

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Atlantic Path Publishing, 2008 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 305 pages
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Writing and Developing Your College Textbook addresses the following questions. College Instructors: Frustrated with textbook offerings in your discipline? Want to have a wider influence on people entering your field? Thinking of writing a textbook for a course you teach? Wondering how textbook writing differs from other academic writing? Need a perspective on issues and trends in textbook publishing? Need to know what you're getting into when you sign on? Curious about what makes a textbook successful? Interested in making good money as a textbook author? Textbook Editors: Frustrated with the textbook manuscripts you see? Need ways to help authors accept and meet their responsibilities? Want authors to understand publishing realities and reasons for what you do? Interested in coaching authors on how to draft and revise efficiently and well? Open to suggestions for maintaining positive author-editor relations? Need a big picture perspective on issues and trends in your business? Want to know more about bringing a manuscript to market level? BRIEF CONTENTS 1 The College Textbook Industry Today 2 How College Textbooks Get Published 3 Interest a Publisher in Your Manuscript 4 Sign a Mutually Lucrative Contract 5 Why Your Textbook Needs Development 6 Write to Reach Your True Audience 7 Establish an Effective Authorial Voice 8 Why You Need Learning Objectives 9 Why Heading Structure Matters 10 What Pedagogy Does for Your Textbook 11 Create Truly Useful Chapter Apparatus 12 Develop Successful Feature Strands 13 Make Drafting and Revising Easier 14 Control Length and Manage Schedule 15 Do Permissions Right 16 Enhance Your Textbook's Value Visually
 

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On the whole a very informative book, but chapters 6--11 are invaluable to one who has taught all her working life. I am now 74 years old and have been given anew assignment--to assist in the conversion of existing course texbooks and the developmentof new ones. I am trying to get someone to buy me a copy and brigit down here to me. Good work all around. Sheila V. Cooper. ED.D 

Contents

Higher Education Publishing Options
6
Publishing Alternatives
15
College Textbook Publishers
22
How College Textbooks Get Published
29
Book Manufacturing
38
Suggestions for SelfMarketing Your Textbook
47
A Track Record
53
Making Contact
60
Plan Your Learning Objectives
150
How to Craft Headings
157
What Is Topical Development?
161
Developing Your Text Sections
169
Pedagogy Pitfalls
176
Internal Apparatus
191
Develop Successful Feature Strands
197
Thematic Boxes
207

Competition
66
Establishing a Positive Relationship
72
Know How to Negotiate Your Agreement
75
Domains of Development
88
Sample Competition Grid
101
Write to Reading Level
110
Write Well
116
Establish an Effective Authorial Voice
124
What Is Tone?
130
Some BadVoice Archetypes
137
Apply Findings from Educational Psychology
143
Firming Up Your Pedagogy Plan
208
Commit to Consistency
215
Working with a Copyeditor
222
Apparatus and Pedagogy Checklist
228
Avoiding Length Creep in Revisions
234
Sample Pages from a Drafting Calendar
242
Developing a Permissions Log and Tracking Requests
248
Enhance Your Textbooks Value Visually
255
Putting It All Together
269
References and Bibliography
291
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Mary Ellen Lepionka is a writer, presenter, and publisher of professional resources for academic authors and editors. She conducts workshops in academic authoring and higher education publishing. Her background includes classroom teaching and curriculum development at the college and high school levels. In her 30-year career in educational publishing, in-house and as a consultant, Lepionka has worked on more than 80 textbook manuscripts, including 27 first editions. Her clients have incuded Pearson Education, Prentice-Hall, Allyn and Bacon, Houghton Mifflin, McGraw-Hill Higher Education, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Sage, Inc., and others, as well as corporate clients. Mary Ellen Lepionka also is the author of Writing and Developing College Textbook Supplements (Atlantic Path Publishing, 2005).

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