American Murder: Homicide in the early 20th century

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Greenwood Publishing Group, 2007 - Murder - 221 pages

America has long had the reputation as the most violent and murderous of modern industralized nations. Even while violent crime has dropped in recent years, our murder rate is still incredibly high. Since the beginning of the 20th century, our society has undergone profound changes, and our technologies have advanced, but the motives and methods for murder and escaping the long arm of the law have kept pace, often capitalizing on availble technologies. In addition, as the century progressed, the media would become an integral part of murder in America, helping investigations, glamorizing murder, and bringing it into our homes on a daily basis. Here, Scott examines the changing face of murder in the context of societal changes, and traces the advances in investigative techniques and technologies. Each chapter offers vivid accounts of the most notorious and representative murders for each time period, focusing especially on those murderers who have had the edge on their pursuers, even escaping detection to this day.

Beginning at the turn of the century, Scott details one of the most notorious cases of the day, in which a jealous lover poisons the wife of her lover. The book ends with the still-unsolved Tupac Shakur murder case. Taking readers through the various developments in methods of murder, and the techniques used to capture the criminals, Scott provides a fascinating overview of the way murder has changed through the decades and how law enforcement has kept pace. This insightful book sheds light on both our fascination with murder and on murderers and their nemeses over the last one hundred years.

 

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Contents

II
1
III
6
IV
12
V
21
VI
26
VII
29
VIII
33
IX
39
XVI
92
XVII
99
XVIII
106
XIX
118
XX
129
XXI
143
XXII
150
XXIII
156

X
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XI
54
XII
62
XIII
71
XIV
76
XV
86
XXIV
162
XXV
171
XXVI
181
XXVII
183
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