The Annual Register, Or, A View of the History, Politics, and Literature for the Year ...

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J. Dodsley, 1800 - History
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Page 336 - To perpetuate our union by a reciprocal deputation of an agent- or agents from the different states, who shall have the privilege of a seat and voice in the parliament of Great Britain ; or, if sent from Britain, in that...
Page 73 - Webb with his situation, and desired he would send him some fresh troops, the general dispatched a messenger to him with a letter, wherein he informed him that it was not in his power to assist him, and therefore gave him orders to surrender up the fort on the best terms he could procure. This packet fell into the hands of the French general, who immediately sent a flag of truce, desiring a conference with the governor.
Page 77 - ... who had connived at it had thereby drawn down on that part of their king's dominions the vengeance of Heaven. To this he added, that he much feared the total loss of them would deservedly be the consequence. How truly this prediction has been verified we well know.
Page 76 - He died in about three months, of a broken heart, and with truth might it be said, that he was an honor to his country.
Page 160 - ... adequate to repel every insult and attack, and to maintain and uphold the power and reputation of this country.
Page 288 - March, 1774, upon lands, tenements, hereditaments, penfions, offices, and perfonal eftates, in that part of Great - Britain, called England, Wales, and the town of Berwick upon Tweed...
Page 327 - Oswald in the execution of this our Commission, and of the powers and authorities herein contained, Provided always, and We do hereby...
Page 135 - Americans would have submitted to his laws, and they resisted them. He thought they would have submitted to his armies, and they were beaten by inferior numbers. He made conciliatory propositions, and he thought they would succeed, but they were rejected. He appointed commissioners to make peace, and he thought they had powers ; but he found they could not make peace, and nobody believed they had any powers.
Page 242 - MAYOR, A COMMON COUNCIL HOLDEN IN THE CHAMBER OF THE GUILDHALL OF THE CITY OF LONDON, ON SATURDAY, THE GTH DAY OF JUNE, 1778.
Page 25 - It is in vain to apologise for the coarseness, obscenity, and scurrility of Skelton, by saying that his poetry is tinctured with the manners of his age. Skelton would have been a writer without decorum at any period.

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