Tempo and Mode in Evolution:: Genetics and Paleontology 50 Years After Simpson

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National Academies Press, Jan 26, 1995 - Science - 336 pages
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Since George Gaylord Simpson published Tempo and Mode in Evolution in 1944, discoveries in paleontology and genetics have abounded. This volume brings together the findings and insights of today's leading experts in the study of evolution, including Ayala, W. Ford Doolittle, and Stephen Jay Gould.
The volume examines early cellular evolution, explores changes in the tempo of evolution between the Precambrian and Phanerozoic periods, and reconstructs the Cambrian evolutionary burst. Long-neglected despite Darwin's interest in it, species extinction is discussed in detail.
Although the absence of data kept Simpson from exploring human evolution in his book, the current volume covers morphological and genetic changes in human populations, contradicting the popular claim that all modern humans descend from a single woman.
This book discusses the role of molecular clocks, the results of evolution in 12 populations of Escherichia coli propagated for 10,000 generations, a physical map of Drosophila chromosomes, and evidence for "hitchhiking" by mutations.

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About the author (1995)

Walter M. Fitch (1929 2011) was Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of California, Irvine. He was a member of the National Academy of Sciences, member of the Human Genome Organization, and the author of more than 200 publications in molecular evolution. His previous books are "Tempo and Mode in Evolution: Genetics and Paleontology Fifty Years after Simpson" and "Variation and Evolution in Plants and Microorganisms: Toward a New Synthesis Fifty Years after Stebbins.

Camilo J. Cela-Conde is Director of the Laboratory of Human Systematics and Professor at the University of Islas Baleares (Spain). He is a Fellow (elected 1999) of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). He is author of two books on human evolution, plus a dozen more books on
fiction, biography, essay, and science. He has published numerous articles in scientific journals, mostly related to anthropology and human evolution Francisco J. Ayala is University Professor and Donald Bren Professor of Biological Sciences at the University of California, Irvine. He was awarded
the U.S. National Medal of Science for 2001. He is a member of the US National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Philosophical Society, and of Academies of Science from Italy, Russia, Spain and other countries. He has received numerous awards and gold
medals, as well as honorary degrees from six countries.

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