The Universities of the Italian Renaissance

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JHU Press, Sep 29, 2004 - Education - 616 pages
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Italian Renaissance universities were Europe's intellectual leaders in humanistic studies, law, medicine, philosophy, and science. Employing some of the foremost scholars of the time -- including Pietro Pomponazzi, Andreas Vesalius, and Galileo Galilei -- the Italian Renaissance university was the prototype of today's research university. This is the first book in any language to offer a comprehensive study of this most influential institution.

In this magisterial study, noted scholar Paul F. Grendler offers a detailed and authoritative account of the universities of Renaissance Italy. Beginning with brief narratives of the origins and development of each university, Grendler explores such topics as the number of professors and their distribution by discipline, student enrollment (some estimates are the first attempted), famous faculty members, budget and salaries, and relations with civil authority. He discusses the timetable of lectures, student living, foreign students, the road to the doctorate, and the impact of the Counter Reformation. He shows in detail how humanism changed research and teaching, producing the medical Renaissance of anatomy and medical botany, new approaches to Aristotle, and mathematical innovation. Universities responded by creating new professorships and suppressing older ones. The book concludes with the decline of Italian universities, as internal abuses and external threats -- including increased student violence and competition from religious schools -- ended Italy's educational leadership in the seventeenth century.

-- Anthony F. D'Elia
 

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Contents

I
ix
II
xi
III
xiii
IV
xvii
V
1
VI
3
VII
12
VIII
19
LXIV
291
LXV
295
LXVI
308
LXVII
312
LXVIII
316
LXIX
322
LXX
326
LXXI
330

IX
29
X
39
XIII
43
XIV
54
XV
62
XVI
68
XIX
75
XX
80
XXI
91
XXII
97
XXIII
104
XXIV
107
XXV
115
XXVI
119
XXVII
124
XXVIII
135
XXIX
138
XXX
140
XXXI
141
XXXII
149
XXXIII
150
XXXIV
155
XXXV
157
XXXVI
164
XXXVII
167
XXXVIII
170
XXXIX
176
XL
178
XLI
181
XLII
184
XLIII
197
XLIV
203
XLV
207
XLVI
212
XLVII
220
XLVIII
223
XLIX
227
L
234
LI
239
LII
245
LIII
247
LIV
248
LV
251
LVI
255
LVII
261
LVIII
264
LIX
265
LX
267
LXI
269
LXII
277
LXIII
279
LXXII
332
LXXIII
339
LXXIV
340
LXXV
349
LXXVI
351
LXXVIII
355
LXXIX
358
LXXX
364
LXXXI
370
LXXXII
379
LXXXIII
382
LXXXIV
383
LXXXV
385
LXXXVI
387
LXXXVII
391
LXXXIX
393
XC
396
XCI
401
XCII
406
XCIII
411
XCIV
413
XCV
424
XCVI
425
XCVII
428
XCVIII
429
XCIX
432
C
434
CI
441
CII
445
CIII
455
CIV
458
CV
463
CVI
467
CVII
470
CVIII
475
CIX
477
CX
481
CXI
482
CXII
484
CXIII
489
CXIV
493
CXV
496
CXVI
498
CXVII
503
CXVIII
506
CXIX
507
CXX
511
CXXI
515
CXXII
567
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Page 563 - The Crisis of Late Humanism and Expectations of Reform in Italy at the End of the Fifteenth and Beginning of the Sixteenth Centuries,
Page 561 - Polonia: Studi in onore dell'UniversitÓ di Cracovia nel VI centenario della sua fondazione. Padua,

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About the author (2004)

Paul F. Grendler is a professor emeritus of history at the University of Toronto, and former president of the Renaissance Society of America. He is the editor-in-chief of the prize-winning Encyclopedia of the Renaissance and author of several books including Schooling in Renaissance Italy, winner of the American Historical Association's Howard R. Marraro Prize for Italian History, also available from Johns Hopkins.

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