The Best American History Essays on Lincoln

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Macmillan, Feb 13, 2009 - History - 252 pages
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This new volume in the Best American History Essays series brings together classic writing from top American historians on one of our greatest presidents. Ranging from incisive assessments of his political leadership, to explorations of his enigmatic character, to reflections on the mythos that has become inseparable from the man, each of these contributions expands our understanding of Abraham Lincoln and shows why he has been such an object of enduring fascination. Contributions include:* James McPherson on Lincoln the military strategist* Richard Hofstadter on the Lincoln legend* Edmund Wilson on his contribution to American letters* John Hope Franklin on the Emancipation Proclamation* James Horton on Lincoln and race* David M. Potter on the secession* Richard Current on Lincoln's political genius* Mark Neely on Lincoln and civil liberties
 

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The best American history essays on Lincoln

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In this special edition of their annual Best American History Essays, the Organization of American Historians tasked Princeton University professor Wilentz to collect the best of Lincoln scholarship ... Read full review

Contents

Abraham Lincoln and the SelfMade Myth
3
Abraham Lincoln
41
Lincoln Race and the Complexity
63
A Strange Friendless Uneducated Penniless Boy
87
A Marriage
107
The Master Politician
129
The Origins and Purpose of Lincolns
149
Why the Republicans Rejected Both Compromise
175
LINCOLN THE PRESIDENCY
189
Lincoln and the Strategy of Unconditional Surrender
207
Lincoln and the Constitution
229
Selected Bibliography
245
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About the author (2009)

Sean Wilentz is the Dayton-Stockton Professor of History at Princeton University. He regularly writes on history and politics for publications such as The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times, The New Republic, and Salon.com. His most recent book is The Rise of American Democracy: Jefferson to Lincoln. He lives in New York City.