The compositions in prose and verse of mr. John Oldham. To which are added memoirs of his life, and explantory notes, by E. Thompson

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Page 18 - Where, tho' perchance you may efcape from blame, Yet Praife you never can expeft, or claim ? Therefore be fure you ftudy to apply To the great Patterns of Antiquity : Ne'er lay the Greeks and Romans out of Sight, Ply them by Day, and think on them by Night. Rough...
Page 84 - Beyond the straits of scanty time and place, Beyond the ebbs and flows of Matter's narrow seas, They reach and fill the ocean of eternity and space. Infused like some vast, mighty soul, Thou dost inform and actuate this spacious whole ; Thy unseen hand...
Page ii - I therefore resolved to alter the Scene from Rome to London, and to make use of English Names of Men, Places and Customs, where the Parallel would decently permit, which I conceived would give a kind of new Air to the Poem, and render it more agreeable to the relish of the present Age.
Page 166 - Rich in thy self, to whose unbounded store Exhausted Nature could vouchsafe no more: Thou could'st alone the Empire of the Stage maintain, Could'st all its Grandeur, and its Port sustain, Nor...
Page 100 - To me thou art, whate'er th'ambitious crave, And all that greedy misers want or have. In youth or age, in travel or at home ; Here, or in town, at London, or at Rome ; Rich, or a beggar, free, or in the Fleet, What'er my fate is, 'tis my fate to write.
Page 98 - With unfelt throes, brings its rude issue forth : How, after, when imperfect, shapeless thought Is, by the judgment, into fashion wrought : When at first search, I traverse o'er my mind, None, but a dark and empty void I find : Some little hints, at length, like sparks break thence, And...
Page 171 - View'd, and ador'd by all th' undoubted Race of Wit, Who only can endure to look on it. The rest o'ercame with too much light, With too much brightness dazled, or extinguish'd quite: Restless, and uncontroul'd it now shall pass As wide a course about the World as he, And when his long-repeated Travels cease Begin a new and vaster Race, And still tread round the endless Circle of Eternity.
Page 162 - Thine was no mad, unruly Frenzy of the brain, Which justly might deserve the Chain, 'Twas brisk, and mettled, but a manag'd Rage, Sprightly as vig'rous Youth, and cool as temp'rate Age: Free, like thy Will, it did all Force...
Page 102 - Born to chaftife the Vices of the Age, Which Pulpits dare not, nor the very Stage...
Page 65 - Son, Thy Waves did long in sobbing Murmurs groan, Long fill'd the Sea with their Complaint, and Moan: But now, alas! thou do'st afresh bewail, Another Son does now thy sorrow call: To part with either thou alike wast loth...

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