The light dragoon

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Henry Colburn, 1844
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Page 99 - ... thrust at poor Harry Wilson's body, and delivered it effectually. I firmly believe that Wilson died on the instant: yet, though he felt the sword in its progress, he, with characteristic self-command, kept his eye still on the enemy in his front; and, raising himself in his stirrups, let fall upon the Frenchman's helmet such a blow, that brass and skull parted before it, and the man's head was cloven asunder to the chin. It was the most tremendous blow I ever saw struck ; and both he who gave,...
Page 95 - The odds were out of all calculation; yet we were nowise disposed to be taken ; so, at the captain's orders, we closed our files, and rode right at them. Never were men so entirely confounded. It was clear that they expected nothing of the sort ; for they sat still, looking us in the face, and never made a movement to meet us. The consequence was, that coming upon them at speed, with all the weight and activity of our more powerful horses, we literally knocked them down like nine pins. Over they...
Page 286 - Lwent the gendarmes in every direction to secure their prizes. It was shocking to see the poor wretches brought in, twenty or thirty in a string, tied round the neck with one cord, the end of which was fastened to a mounted policeman's saddle. And then for their lodging they had a particular barrack, being well and rigidly guarded there by a body of old French soldiers, every effort to corrupt whose fidelity proved as fruitless as were the endeavours to elude or deceive their vigilance. Once, and...
Page 98 - ... neck, delivered a thrust at poor Harry Wilson's body, and delivered it effectually. I firmly believe that Wilson died on the instant: yet, though he felt the sword in its progress, he, with characteristic self-command, kept his eye still on the enemy in his front; and, raising himself in his stirrups, let fall upon the Frenchman's helmet such a blow, that brass and skull parted before it, and the man's head was cloven asunder to the chin. It was the most tremendous blow I ever saw struck ; and...
Page 83 - The light horseman, on the contrary, has not only his own wants, but those of his charger, to attend to ; and the difference to the horse in the sort of life, which on service he is required to lead, is infinitely greater than the difference to his rider — supposing both to have been reared in England. In Portugal, for example, we had Indian corn served out as forage, which our horses would not taste, and which we could not get them to taste till we tried the experiment of soaking : moreover, we...

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