The History of Sweden, Volume 1

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R. Bentley, 1844 - Sweden - 411 pages
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Page 92 - ... arms to be blown on the trumpets, and offered the Danish enemy peace and quarter, which they accepted. The next morning king Ring caused the field of battle to be carefully searched for king Harald's corpse, which was not found till the middle of the day, under a heap of slain. Ring caused it to be taken up, washed, and honourably treated according to the custom of those times, and laid it in Harald's chariot. A great mound was then raised, and the horse which had drawn Harald during the battle...
Page 95 - ... upon her brothers, and defeated them with great slaughter. After the battle he ordered Alfsol to be sought for ; but poison having been given to her by her brothers, lest she should fall into his hands, he only found her corpse. The old king was so enraged by this disappointment that he resolved to live no longer. He therefore commanded all the dead bodies to be carried into a ship, seated himself by the rudder in the stern, and laid the body of Alfsol by his side. He afterwards caused the ship...
Page 92 - ... horse was killed ; and king Ring caused his own saddle to be brought in, and gave it to his friend king Harald, praying him to use it in riding to dwell with Odin in Walhalla. After this he caused a great funeral feast to be celebrated, and at its conclusion begged all the warriors and chief men that were present to honour Harald by gifts and ornaments. Many precious things were thrown in, large bracelets and excellent arms ; after which the mound was carefully closed and preserved, and king...
Page 101 - Ake highly irritated, and everything was done as this wicked woman desired : they crept into the barn, and Ake with his ax gave the sleeping Heimer his death-wound. After this they carried the harp into their cottage, and struck a light. They tried to open it ; but it was so curiously closed, that they could not find the spring, and were obliged to break it up. You may imagine their astonishment on finding Aslauga resting amid costly stuffs and golden ornaments. They were alarmed at the discovery,...
Page 265 - Sweden, which for one hundred and twenty years had filled the country with war and bloodshed ; for not a King of this race is to be found who did not commit violence on, and act treacherously by his nearest relations, father, brother, and children. They were the cause of their own ruin by their persecutions of each other, to the degree that no noble branch remained of a family once so numerous.
Page 118 - Biorn grasped the handle of the lance so hard that he left the marks of his fingers in it, and then hacked it so violently, that it broke in pieces.
Page 133 - Erik mounted on one of the mounds, and promised a great reward to him who could sing a Drapa* on this battle. On this, Torwald Hjalteson, an Icelander, presented himself, and...
Page 97 - ... he had heard Jarl Herod's promise spoken of; and, though he seemed to take no notice of it, he inwardly resolved to undertake the daring enterprise, from which all other men shrunk back with fear and hopelessness. Accordingly he caused a coat to be made for himself of hairy skin, and a cloak of the same kind. These he caused to be boiled in pitch, drawn through sand, and finally hardened in the sun. The following summer he sailed with his fleet to East Gothland ; and, anchoring in the nighttime...
Page 101 - Heimer was ? He said he was a beggar, and sought a lodging for the night ; but as he was warming himself by the hearth, Grima saw by the firelight a gold bracelet glimmering under his rags, and some precious embroidery sticking out of the harp. Grima then granted his request ; but said he would not be able to get any peace in that room, on account of her and her old man's gabbling, and bade him therefore lie in a barn, which she showed him. "When her husband presently after came home, Grima related...
Page 131 - This he and his army were obliged to witness from the shore, having no means of preventing or punishing Harald's treachery. He, however, did not lose courage, but made his men cut a broad road through the forest, to the great plain of Fyrisvall, near Upsala. On this plain he...

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