Chickamauga, Volume 1

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Fergus printing Company, 1888 - Chickamauga (Ga.), Battle of, 1863 - 295 pages
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Great to have the book available, but unfortunately Google's digitization does not include any of the book's essential maps. If you need to see the maps -- and most would like to -- you will have to look elsewhere. Like in a library.

Contents

I
9
II
21
III
31
IV
44
V
52
VII
65
VIII
85
IX
91
XI
104
XII
116
XIV
127
XV
139
XVI
150
XVII
161

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Page 19 - Facts are the mere dross of history. It is from the abstract truth which interpenetrates them, and lies la"tent among them, like gold in the ore, that the mass derives its whole value...
Page 153 - It also left open to the enemy, at a distance of only 10 miles, our battle-field, with thousands of our wounded and his own, and all the trophies and supplies we had won. All this was to be risked and given up for what ? To gain the enemy's rear and cut him off from his depot of supplies by the route over the .mountains, when the very movement abandoned to his unmolested use the better, and more practicable route, of half the length, on the south side of the river. It is hardly necessary to say the...
Page 193 - Brannan's right, moved forward his artillery and drove the enemy down the southern slope, inflicting on him a most terrible loss in killed and wounded. This opportune arrival of fresh troops revived the flagging spirits of our men on the right and inspired them with new ardor for the contest. Every assault of the enemy from that time until nightfall was repulsed in the most gallant style by the whole line. By this time the ammunition in the boxes of the men was reduced on an average to two or three...
Page 153 - Such a movement was utterly impossible for want of transportation. Nearly half our army consisted of reinforcements just before the battle, without a wagon or an artillery horse, and nearly, if not quite, a third of the artillery horses on the field had been lost. The railroad bridges, too, had been destroyed to a point south of Ringgold, and on all the road from Cleveland to Knoxville. To these insurmountable difficulties were added the entire absence of means to cross the river, except by fording...
Page 30 - Stevens's and Cooper's gaps. Thrown off his guard by our rapid movement, apparently in retreat, when, in reality we had concentrated opposite his center, and deceived by the information from deserters and others sent into his lines, the enemy pressed on his columns to intercept us, and thus exposed himself in detail.
Page 153 - The suggestion of a movement by our right immediately after the battle to the north of the Tennessee and thence upon Nashville requires notice only because it will find a place on the files of the department. Such a movement was utterly impossible for want of transportation. Nearly half our army consisted of re-enforcements just before the battle without a wagon or an artillery horse, and nearly, if not quite, a third of the artillery horses on the field had been lost.
Page 29 - ... toward our left and rear in the direction of Dalton and Rome, keeping Lookout Mountain between us. The nature of the country and the want of supplies in it, with the presence of Burnside's force on our right, rendered a movement on the enemy's rear with our inferior force extremely hazardous, if not impracticable.
Page 44 - Athens to connect with you. After holding the mountain passes on the west, and Dalton, or some other point on the railroad, to prevent the return of Bragg's army, it will be decided whether your army shall move further south into Georgia and Alabama.
Page 194 - ... movement, and I left the position behind General Wood's command to meet Reynolds and point out to him the position where I wished him to form line to cover the retirement of the other troops on the left. In passing through an open woods bordering...
Page 19 - No past event has any intrinsic importance. The knowledge of it is valuable only as it leads us to form just calculations with respect to the future.

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