Ivanhoe: A Romance, Volume 2

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Archibald Constable and Company, 1820 - Great Britain - 374 pages
54 Reviews
 

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Review: Ivanhoe

User Review  - Maryann - Goodreads

My copy of this book is old, water-stained, warped and did I mention, old? It was my great uncle's book and I like to think of him as a young man, reading it and getting just as irritated with the ... Read full review

Review: Ivanhoe

User Review  - sologdin - Goodreads

Much prefer this edition over the older Signet--better notes and peripheral materials. It's badass, despite some severely retrograde content. Best in its errors: the repeated invocation of Zerneboch ... Read full review

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Contents

I
3
II
15
III
41
IV
51
V
69
VI
85
VII
101
VIII
121
IX
141
X
158
XI
183
XII
201
XIII
216
XIV
254
XV
283
XVI
308

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Page 15 - FAR in a wild, unknown to public view, From youth to age a reverend hermit grew ; The moss his bed, the cave his humble cell, His food the fruits, his drink the crystal well : Remote from man, with God he pass'd the days, Prayer all his business, all his pleasure praise.
Page 291 - What device does he bear on his shield ? " replied Ivanhoe. " Something resembling a bar of iron, and a padlock, painted blue, on the black shield." "A fetterlock and shacklebolt azure," said Ivanhoe. "I know not who may bear the device, but well I ween it might now be mine own. Canst thou not see the motto ? " . "Scarce the device itself at this distance," replied Rebecca; "but when the sun glances fair upon his shield, it shows as I tell you.
Page 296 - They pull down the piles and palisades; they hew down the barriers with axes. — His high black plume floats abroad over the throng, like a raven over the field of the slain. — They have made a breach in the barriers — they rush in — they are thrust back ! — Frontde-Boeuf heads the defenders; I see his gigantic form above the press.
Page 295 - Foul craven !" exclaimed Ivanhoe ; "does he blench from the helm when the wind blows highest? " ' ' He blenches not ! he blenches not ! " said Rebecca, " I see him now ; he leads a body of men close under the outer barrier of the barbican...
Page 289 - Following with wonderful promptitude the directions of Ivanhoe, and availing herself of the protection of the large ancient shield, which she placed against the lower part of the window, Rebecca, with tolerable security to herself, could witness part of what was passing without the castle, and report to Ivanhoe the preparations which the assailants were making for the storm.
Page 293 - Front-de-Boeuf and his allies showed an obstinacy in defence proportioned to the fury of the attack, and replied with the discharge of their large cross-bows, as well as with their long-bows, slings, and other missile weapons, to the close and continued shower of arrows, and, as the assailants were necessarily but indifferently protected, did considerably more damage than they received at their hand. The whizzing of shafts and of missiles, on both sides, was only interrupted by the shouts which arose...
Page 291 - None of mark and distinction that I can behold from this station," said Rebecca ; " but, doubtless, the other side of the castle is also assailed. They appear even now preparing to advance.
Page 297 - Front-de-Bceuf," answered the Jewess. "His men rush to the rescue, headed by the haughty Templar — their united force compels the champion to pause. — They drag Front-de-Bceuf within the walls." "The assailants have won the barriers, have they not?
Page 290 - Rebecca could observe, from the number of men placed for the defence of this post, that the besieged entertained apprehensions for its safety ; and from the mustering of the assailants in a direction nearly opposite to the outwork, it seemed no less plain that it had been selected as a vulnerable point of attack. These appearances she hastily communicated to Ivanhoe, and added, ' The skirts of the wood seem lined with archers, although only a few are advanced from its dark shadow.
Page 300 - all about him is black as the wing of the night raven. Nothing can I spy that can mark him further — but having once seen him put forth his strength in battle, methinks I could know him again among a thousand warriors. He rushes to the fray as if he were summoned to a banquet. There is more than mere strength, there seems as if the whole soul and spirit of the champion were given to every blow which he deals upon his enemies. God assoilzie him of the sin of bloodshed!

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