Ontology: Or, The Theory of Being; an Introduction to General Metaphysics

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Longmans, Green and Company, 1914 - Metaphysics - 439 pages
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Contents

In what Sense are All Things that Exist or can Exist said to be Real or to have Being?
36
Real Being and Logical Being
42
Real Being and Ideal Being
45
Fundamental Distinctions in Real Being
46
CHAPTER
51
a Possibility Absolute Relative and Adequate
52
b Subjective Potentia Active and Passive
54
its Relation to Potentiality
56
Analysis of Change
61
Kinds of Change
68
1
74
Essence
75
Characteristics of Abstract Essences
79
Grounds of those Characteristics
82
Possible Essences as such are Something Distinct from mere Logical Being and from Nothingness
84
89 91 17 Possible Essences have besides Ideal Being no other sort of Being or Reality Proper and Intrinsic to Themselves
86
Inferences from our Knowledge of Possible Essences
89
Critical Analysis of those Inferences
91
Essences are Intrinsically Possible not because God can make them Exist actually nor yet because He freely wills them to be possible nor because He ...
95
Distinction between Essence and Existence in actually existing Con tingent or Created Beings
101
State of the Question
103
The Theory of Distinctions in its Application to the Question
104
Solutions of the Question
107
CHAPTER IV
114
Transcendental Unity
115
Kinds of Unity
116
Multitude and Number
118
The Individual and the Universal
120
The Metaphysical Grades of Being in the Individual
122
Individuality
123
The Principle of Individuation
125
Individuation of Accidents
133
Identity
135
Distinction
139
Logical Distinctions and their Grounds
140
The Virtual Distinction and the Real Distinction 38 The Real Distinction and its Tests 39 Some Questionable Distinctions The Scotist Distinction 123 1...
142
CHAPTER V
158
Ontological Truth Considered Synthetically from the Standpoint of its Ultimate Real Basis 42 Ontological Truth a Transcendental Aitribute of Reality ...
160
CHAPTER VI
167
The Good as an End Perfecting the Nature
168
The Perfect Analysis of the Notion of Perfection
171
Grades of Perfection Reality as Standard of Value
172
The Good the Real and the Actual
173
Phenomenist Difficulties against this View Its Vindication
219
Erroneous Views on the Nature of Substance
225
The Nature of Accident Its Relation to Substance Its Causes
232
Real Existence of Accidents
240
Distinction between Substance and its Proper Accidents Unity
246
CHAPTER IX
252
Subsistence and Personality
261
Consciousness of the Personal Self
273
CHAPTER X
285
Habits and Dispositions
292
Powers Faculties and Forces
298
168
305
Corporeal Substance Quantity and Extension
311
Place and Space
318
Eternity
328
CHAPTER XII
332
Analysis of the Concept of Relation
336
Logical Relations
338
Real Relations Their Existence Vindicated
341
173
343
Predicamental Relations Their Foundations and Divisions
345
In what does the Reality of Predicamental Relations Consist?
349
174
350
CHAPTER XIII
357
Aristotles Fourfold Division
361
Material and Formal Causes
364
Efficient Cause Traditional Concept Explained
366
Some Scholia on Causation The Principle of Causality
369
Classification of Efficient Causes
372
CHAPTER XIV
381
Origin of the Concept of Efficient Cause
385
a The First Cause and Created Causes
388
b Actio Immanens and Actio Transiens
391
Erroneous Theories of Efficient Causality Imagination and Thought
392
The Subject of Efficient Causality Occasionalism
396
CHAPTER XV
404
Classification of Final Causes
406
Causality of the Final Cause Relation of the Latter to Efficient Formal and Material Causes
411
Nature and the Laws of Nature Character and Grounds of their Necessity and Universality Scientific Determinism and Philosophic Fatalism
416
The Order of the Universe A Fact and its Implications
428
INDEX
435
177
436
182
438

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Page 31 - Let knowledge grow from more to more, But more of reverence in us dwell; That mind and soul, according well, May make one music as before, But vaster.
Page 277 - I think, is a thinking intelligent being, that has reason and reflection, and can consider itself as itself, the same thinking thing, in different times and places...
Page 228 - Per substantiam intelligo id, quod in se est et per se concipitur; hoc est id, cujus conceptus non indiget conceptu alterius rei, a quo formari debeat.
Page 213 - We may well ask what causes induce us to believe in the existence of body; but 'tis in vain to ask whether there be body or not. That is a point which we must take for granted in all our reasonings.
Page 213 - The idea then we have, to which we give the general name substance, being nothing but the supposed but unknown support of those qualities we find existing, which we imagine cannot subsist, "sine re substante," without something to support them, we call that support substantia; which, according to the true import of the word, is in plain English, standing under or upholding.
Page 198 - Filii: nam ad pulchritudinem tria requiruntur. Primo quidem integritas sive perfectio; quae enim diminuta sunt, hoc ipso turpia sunt; et debita proportio sive consonantia; et iterum claritas. Unde quae habent colorem nitidum, pulchra esse dicuntur.
Page 380 - The Law of Causation, which is the main pillar of inductive science, is but the familiar truth, that invariability of succession is found by observation to obtain between every fact in nature and some other fact which has preceded it ; independently of all considerations respecting the ultimate mode of production of phenomena, and of every other question regarding the nature of
Page 277 - ... are three names standing for three different ideas; for such as is the idea belonging to that name, such must be the identity...
Page 276 - This also shows wherein the identity of the same man consists; viz. in nothing but a participation of the same continued life, by constantly fleeting particles of matter, in succession vitally united to the same organized body.
Page 276 - That being then one plant which has such an organization of parts in one coherent body par.taking of one common life, it continues to be the same plant as long as it partakes of the same life, though that life be communicated to new particles of matter vitally united to the living plant, in a like continued organization conformable to that sort of plants.

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