Modern Chinese Literature in the May Fourth Era

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Harvard University Press, 1977 - History - 464 pages
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One of the most creative and brilliant episodes in modern Chinese history, the cultural and literary flowering that takes the name of the May Fourth Movement, is the subject of this comprehensive and insightful book. This is the first study of modern Chinese literature that shows how China's Confucian traditions were combined with Western influences to create a literature of new values and consciousness for the Chinese people.

 

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Contents

Native and Foreign Impact
15
The Impact of Western Literary Trends
37
The Impact of Japanese Literary Trends
63
The Impact of Russian Literature
89
Qu Qiubai and Russian Literature
103
Images of Oppressed Peoples and Modern
127
The May Fourth Writers
143
Notes on Lu Xuns
161
The Central Contradiction in Mao Duns
233
Mao Dun and the Use of Political Allegory
261
The Changing Relationship between Literature
281
Yu Dafu and the Transition to Modern Chinese
309
Continuities and Discontinuities
325
Qu Qiubais Critique of the May Fourth
351
Change and Continuity in Chinese Fiction
385
Contributors
407

Literature and Revolutionfrom Mara
189
Lu Xuns Medicine
221

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About the author (1977)

Merle Goldman is Professor of History, Emerita, at Boston University and Associate of the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies at Harvard University.

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