The History of Georgia, Volume 1

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Houghton, Mifflin and Company, 1883 - Georgia
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Page 57 - They nourished by your indulgence ! They grew by your neglect of them. As soon as you began to care about them, that care was exercised in sending persons to rule them...
Page 253 - That it be recommended to the respective assemblies and conventions of the United Colonies, where no government sufficient to the exigencies of their affairs has been hitherto established, to adopt such government as shall in the opinion of the representatives of the people, best conduce to the happiness and safety of their constituents in particular, and America in general.
Page 69 - In such a cause, your success would be hazardous. America, if she fell, would fall like the strong man. She would embrace the pillars of the state, and pull down the constitution along with her.
Page 69 - Be to her faults a little blind Be to her virtues very kind." Upon the whole, I will beg leave to tell the house what is my opinion. It is, that the stamp act be repealed absolutely, totally, and immediately.
Page 121 - Then, Sir, from these six capital sources, of descent, of form of government, of religion in the northern provinces, of manners in the southern, of education, of the remoteness of situation from the first mover of government, — from all these causes a fierce spirit of liberty has grown up.
Page 255 - The right of suffrage in the election of members for both Houses, shall remain as exercised at present; and each House shall choose its own Speaker, appoint its own officers, settle its own rules of proceeding, and direct writs of election for supplying intermediate vacancies.
Page 161 - ... may be recommended by the continental congress, or resolved upon by our provincial convention, for the purpose of preserving our constitution and opposing the execution of the several arbitrary and oppressive acts of the British parliament...
Page 185 - ... purchase, any slave imported after the first day of December next; after which time, we will wholly discontinue the slave trade, and will neither be concerned in it ourselves, nor will we hire our vessels, nor sell our commodities or manufactures to those who are concerned in it.
Page 242 - Your gallant behavior in defence of liberty and your country entitles you to the highest honors ; accept these two standards as a reward justly due to your regiment ; and I make not the least doubt, under Heaven's protection, you will stand by them as long as they can wave in the air of liberty.
Page 443 - It really appears to me that the propriety of attempting to defend the town depended on the probability of defending the bar, and that when this ceased, the attempt ought to have been relinquished.

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