Walden ; And, Civil Disobedience

Front Cover
Penguin, 1983 - Philosophy - 431 pages
6 Reviews
'If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music he hears, however measured or far away.'
Disdainful of America's growing commercialism and industrialism, Henry David Thoreau left Concord, Massachusetts, in 1845 to live in solitude in the woods by Walden Pond. Walden, the classic account of his stay there, conveys at once a naturalist's wonder at the commonplace and a Transcendentalist's yearning for spiritual truth and self-reliance. But even as Thoreau disentangled himself from worldly matters, his solitary musings were often disturbed by his social conscience. 'Civil Disobedience', expressing his antislavery and antiwar sentiments, has influenced nonviolent resistance movements worldwide. Michael Meyer's introduction points out that Walden is not so much an autobiographical study as a 'shining example' of Transcendental individualism. So, too, 'Civil Disobedience' is less a call to political activism than a statement of Thoreau's insistence on living a life of principle.
Introduction by MICHAEL MEYER

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Walden and Civil Disobedience

User Review  - tonyxford - Overstock.com

The is a classic as many have already expressed. Thoreau makes many good points and raises questions about personal freedoms we have and those which we take for granted. Read full review

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WALDEN is a great read. It is one of the best reflective retreats from life that I know of. Its simple format, simple writing (though inlaid beautifully with allusions: cultural, religious, scholarly, literary, and otherwise), and over focus on simplicity leave the reader with a smile after every reading (though perhaps it leaves the reader feeling slightly inadequate for not having achieved simplicity to Thoreau's extent). 

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About the author (1983)

Henry David Thoreau was born in Concord, Massachusetts in 1817. He graduated from Harvard in 1837, the same year he began his lifelong Journal. Inspired by Ralph Waldo Emerson, Thoreau became a key member of the Transcendentalist movement that included Margaret Fuller and Bronson Alcott. The Transcendentalists' faith in nature was tested by Thoreau between 1845 and 1847 when he lived for twenty-six months in a homemade hut at Walden Pond. While living at Walden, Thoreau worked on the two books published during his lifetime: Walden (1854) and A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers (1849). Several of his other works, including The Maine Woods, Cape Cod, and Excursions, were published posthumously. Thoreau died in Concord, at the age of forty-four, in 1862.