Babylon to Voyager and Beyond: A History of Planetary Astronomy

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Cambridge University Press, May 29, 2003 - Science - 558 pages
Babylon to Voyager and Beyond describes the fascinating story of planetary research from the time of the Babylonians and Ancient Greeks to the modern age of space exploration. In it, David Leverington outlines the key astronomical discoveries in their historical context, covering not only the successes but also the main failures. Babylon to Voyager and Beyond is written to be accessible to both amateur and professional astronomers, and those interested in the history of science. Extensively illustrated, the book concludes with a description of the extensive planetary discoveries made by spacecraft, and the discoveries of planets around other stars.
 

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This book is really fascinating and informative.I would love to own this book,I am very interested in Astrophysics and want to pursue my higher studies in Astrophysical engineering.

Contents

Introduction
1
THE ANCIENTS 11 Early astronomy
2
12 The Babylonians
4
13 The Greeks
12
14 The Greeks in Egypt
27
15 Epicycles
32
COPERNICUS AND THE NEW COSMOLOGY 21 TheDark1 Ages
40
22 Copernicus
44
THE OUTER SOLAR SYSTEM IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY 81 Jupiter
247
82 Saturn
254
83 Uranus
264
84 Neptune
267
91 Pluto
269
92 Mercury
276
93 Venus
278
94 Origin of the solar system
284

23 Tycho Brahe
48
KEPLER AND GALILEO THE FALL OF EPICYCLES AND THE START OF TELESCOPIC ASTRONOMY 31 Kepler
55
32 Early telescopes
70
33 Galileo
72
THE MID AND LATE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY 41 Saturn
91
42 Jupiters satellites
98
43 New planetary characteristics
102
44 Solar parallax
105
45 The moon
106
46 Early concepts of gravity and Descartes vortex theory
110
47 Isaac Newton
112
CONSOLIDATION 51 Halleys comet
133
52 Atmospheric refraction
136
53 Aberration of light
138
54 The 1761 and 1769 transits of Venus
140
55 Secular acceleration of the moon
146
THE SOLAR SYSTEM EXPANDS 61 William Herschel and the discovery of Uranus
148
62 Saturn
155
63 Origin of the solar system
159
64 The first asteroids
161
65 The discovery of Neptune
166
THE INNER SOLAR SYSTEM IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY 71 Vulcan
181
72 Asteroids
186
73 Comets
192
74 Meteor showers
202
75 Kreutz sungrazing comets
211
76 Mercury
213
77 Venus
216
78 The moon
219
79 The earth
227
710 Mars
233
95 The moon
290
96 The earth
292
97 Mars
304
98 Internal structures and atmospheres of the four large outer planets
310
99 Jupiter
319
910 Saturn Differential rotation
322
911 Uranus Rotation period
326
912 Neptune Rotation period
331
913 Asteroids Orbits
336
914 Comets Chemical composition
341
THE SPACE AGE TERRESTRIAL PLANETS 101 The earth The ionosphere
350
102 The moon
360
103 Origin of the solar system
372
104 Mercury
379
105 Venus
382
106 Mars Prespacecraft concepts
400
THE SPACE AGE THE OUTER PLANETS 111 Jupiter Pioneer 10
426
112 Saturn Pioneer 11
452
113 Uranus
466
114 Neptune
477
115 Pluto and Charon
487
116 Asteroids Spacecraft intercepts
491
117 Comets
502
118 Other solar systems
507
119 Concluding remarks
512
Glossary
514
Bibliography
523
Units
533
Name index
534
Subject index
547
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

David Leverington held a variety of senior positions in the space industry, and is now retired.

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