Brave New World

Front Cover
HarperCollins, Jan 19, 2010 - Fiction - 384 pages
228 Reviews

The astonishing novel Brave New World, originally published in 1932, presents Aldous Huxley's legendary vision of a world of tomorrow utterly transformed. In Huxley's darkly satiric yet chillingly prescient imagining of a "utopian" future, humans are genetically designed and pharmaceutically anesthetized to passively serve a ruling order. A powerful work of speculative fiction that has enthralled and terrified readers for generations, it remains remarkably relevant to this day as both a warning to be heeded and as a thought-provoking yet satisfying entertainment.

This deluxe edition also includes the nonfiction work "Brave New World Revisited," "a thought-jabbing, terrifying book" (Chicago Tribune), first published in 1958. It is a fascinating essay in which Huxley compares the modern-day world with his prophetic fantasy envisioned in Brave New World. He scrutinizes threats to humanity such as overpopulation, propaganda, and chemical persuasion, and explains why we have found it virtually impossible to avoid them.

With a Foreword by Christopher Hitchens

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A wonderful novel and very easy to read. - LibraryThing
Needless to say, it was a drastic change of pace. - LibraryThing
Absolutely amazing premise and execution. - LibraryThing
It just seems stupid this change of plot occurs. - LibraryThing
I did really like the ending. - LibraryThing
The ending again, was stronger. - LibraryThing

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User Review  - josmith16 - LibraryThing

To actually put in perspective the quality of this book, I will have to start by stating that I have recently read few books by current authors who also have written dystopia novels: The Hunger Games ... Read full review

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User Review  - LindaLiu - LibraryThing

Interesting. A challenging read. A clinical future of genetically modified happiness and fragile stability but of little substance. One savage struggles to understand it. Not sure I enjoyed it at all. It took a long time to read for a reason... but it does make you think. Read full review

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About the author (2010)

Aldous Huxley (1894-1963) is the author of the classic novels Island, Eyeless in Gaza, and The Genius and the Goddess, as well as such critically acclaimed nonfiction works as The Devils of Loudun, The Doors of Perception, and The Perennial Philosophy. Born in Surrey, England, and educated at Oxford, he died in Los Angeles.

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