Circular

Front Cover
U.S. Government Printing Office, 1956 - Meteorology
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 95 - ... dry and so extremely small that they cannot be felt or discovered individually by the unaided eye; however, they diminish the visibility and give a characteristic smoky (hazy and opalescent) appearance to the air. This phenomenon produces a uniform veil over the landscape and subdues its colors. This veil has a bluish tinge when viewed against a dark background, such as a mountain, but has a dirty yellow or orange tint against a bright background, such as the sun, clouds at the horizon, or snow-capped...
Page 143 - Stratocumulus not proceeding from the spreading out of Cumulus. Stratus in a more or less continuous sheet or layer, or in ragged shreds or both, but no Stratus fractus of bad weather. Stratus fractus of bad weather or Cumulus fractus of bad weather (pannus), or both; usually below Altostratus or Nimbostratus. Cumulus and Stratocumulus, other than those formed from the spreading out of Cumulus; the base of Cumulus is at different level from that of Stratocumulus.
Page 139 - Widespread dust in suspension in the air, not raised by wind at or near 'the station at the time of observation.
Page 139 - Fog at a distance at the time of observation, but not at the station during the last hour, the fog extending to a level above that of the observer 41 Fog...
Page 132 - Period (Column 53). Swell period is the average time between successive crests, measured to the nearest second. Determine swell period by watching the rise and fall in the swell of a patch of foam or other floating object, and enter in seconds in column 53. When the elapsed time, measured by a stopwatch, of ten successive rises of such an object has been obtained, a good average period may be recorded by taking onetenth of the value. 2.54 (WS, N) Surf (Column 54). At stations with means of observing...
Page 145 - Any one of the following cases: (a) Altocumulus in two or more layers usually opaque in places and not progressively invading the sky; (b) Opaque layer of Altocumulus not progressively invading the sky; (c) Altocumulus coexisting with Altostratus or Nimbostratus or with both.
Page 143 - ... nor in the form of an anvil; Cumulus, Stratocumulus or Stratus may be present. Stratocumulus formed by the spreading out of Cumulus; Cumulus may also be present. Stratocumulus not resulting from the spreading out of Cumulus. Stratus in a more or less continuous sheet or layer, or in ragged shreds or both, but no Stratus fractus of bad weather. Stratus fractus of bad weather or Cumulus fractus of bad weather or both (pannus) usually below Alt ost rutus or Nimbostratus.
Page 145 - Cirrostratus only; in either case they are progressively invading the sky, and generally growing denser as a whole, but the continuous veil does not reach 45 degrees above the horizon.
Page 145 - Cirrus (often in bands converging towards one point or two opposite points of the horizon) and Cirrostratus, or Cirrostratus alone; in either case, they are progressively invading the sky, and generally growing denser as a whole; the continuous veil extends more than 45 degrees above the horizon, without the sky being totally covered.
Page 140 - Slight snow or rain and snow mixed or hail* at time of observation 94 Moderate or heavy snow, or rain and snow mixed or hail* at time of observation 95 Thunderstorm, slight or moderate, without hail* but with rain and/or snow at time...

Bibliographic information