A practical introduction to Greek accentuation

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Page 255 - There are in Greek, as in other languages, words so unimportant of themselves that they have no accent of their own, but are associated by the speaker with the really accented word to which they belong, in the same way as if the two formed one word. In Greek, however, a distinction is observed in such words : 1. those which stand before, and 2. those which stand after the word that they refer to. The former of these unaccented words are called proclitics, and are not furnished by the Greeks with...
Page iii - is a work of no small difficulty, and for our guidance we find either principles so vague that they cannot be applied, or rules so numerous that they cannot be remembered.
Page x - The North American Review, fondly reproachful, waves a chiding finger: It is apparent to any one who will take the trouble to look over the books which make up the burden of a bookseller's counter, that it has become a wonderfully common piece of temerity for a lady to make a book.
Page 196 - There seems to have been some difference of opinion as to the exact whereabouts of the lady who was conducting the class at the time when the accident happened. Speaking for myself, I do not know that it is very material. : What the learned judge said is this : Miss Cox proceeded to one of the steamers in order to extract the puddings, and, while she was doing...
Page 57 - ... accuratius qui rem cognorint, omnino talem regulam tradi posse desperabunt. Adeo facile ex epithetis fiunt appellativa, adeo indiscreta est primitivorum et derivatorum similitude, adeo late patet metonymiae usus , ut proprias cuj usque vocabuli notas promittere prope cujusdam insolentiae videatur.
Page iii - ... those who are unable to see the absurdity of perpetuating in writing a something to which they never attend in reading, and who persist in ornamenting their Greek with three small scratches, the very meaning of which is doubtful and perhaps unknown.
Page 157 - Zijv in niimmo syracusano. la accentu haec vocabula sibi constant, nisi quod иАя'г circumflexura habet in Aristot. Probl. XXIX. 14. p. 952, 21. et in codd. Laur. et Paris. Nicom. V. 2. p. 1129, 30. contra Grammaticorum praeceptum ovSiv els eis [ovovtaov nsQiaTiatai el щ to els Ahecd.
Page 54 - ... accented. This law is founded upon the rapidity with which such a vowel was pronounced. , I. O occurs in the termination of the rst declension only in the genitive sing, of masculines, where in the common declension the о of the termination appears contracted with the characteristic vowel a into ou. The old ao, however, is changed by the Attic or old Ionic declension into...
Page iii - It is remarkable that we accent Homer and Hesiod, Lascaris and Gaza in substantially the same way; which is tacitly to assume that no material change in pronunciation took place for the space of more than two thousand years. If true, this is an interesting fact.
Page 255 - ... really accented word to which they belong, in the same way as if the two formed one word. In Greek, however, a distinction is observed in such words : 1. those which stand before, and 2. those which stand after the word that they refer to. The former of these unaccented words are called proclitics, and are not furnished by the Greeks with a sign of accent ; the others are called enclitics. They differ from each other merely by position ; for eg TOI belongs to both in roypi-o, the first...

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