The Man who Mistook His Wife for a Hat

Front Cover
Duckworth, 2011 - Mental illness - 257 pages
In his most extraordinary book, Oliver Sacks recounts the stories of patients lost in the bizarre, apparently inescapable world of neurological disorders. These are case studies of people who have lost their memories and with them the greater part of their pasts; who are no longer able to recognise people or common objects. In Dr Sacks's splendid and sympathetic telling, each tale is a unique and deeply human study of life struggling against incredible adversity.

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5 stars
978
4 stars
1176
3 stars
904
2 stars
287
1 star
65

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User Review  - nosborm - LibraryThing

Wow, what a great book! Though I'm not very knowledgeable about neurology, this book was extremely compelling and a fairly quick read too. Sacks is an excellent and vivid writer and observer. My only ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Islandmum84 - LibraryThing

It’s a non-fiction, this says much for the 4 stars as I don’t love non-fiction. I love the nice writing style of Dr Sacks, he takes the complicated neurological disorders and turns them in palatable information Read full review

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About the author (2011)

Oliver Sacks was born in 1933 in London and was educated at Queen's College, Oxford. He completed his medical training at San Francisco's Mount Zion Hospital and at UCLA before moving to New York, where he soon encountered the patients whom he would write about in his book Awakenings.

Dr Sacks spent almost fifty years working as a neurologist and wrote many books, including The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat, Musicophilia, and Hallucinations, about the strange neurological predicaments and conditions of his patients. The New York Times referred to him as 'the poet laureate of medicine', and over the years he received many awards, including honours from the Guggenheim Foundation, the National Science Foundation, the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and the Royal College of Physicians. In 2008, he was appointed Commander of the British Empire. His memoir, On the Move, was published shortly before his death in August 2015.

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