Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books 1 - 10 of 180 on Take them all, O Hiawatha!" From the earth he tore the fibres, Tore the tough roots....
" Take them all, O Hiawatha!" From the earth he tore the fibres, Tore the tough roots of the Larch-Tree, Closely sewed the bark together, Bound it closely to the framework. "
The Song of Hiawatha - Page 69
by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow - 1908 - 242 pages
Full view - About this book

The Song of Hiawatha

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow - Indians of North America - 1855 - 316 pages
...Closely sewed the bark together, Bound it closely to the framework. " Give me of your balm, O Fir-Tree ! Of your balsam and your resin, So to close the seams...not enter, That the river may not wet me ! " And the Fir- Tree, tall and sombre, Sobbed through all its robes of darkness, Rattled like a shore with pebbles,...
Full view - About this book

Putnam's Monthly Magazine of American Literature, Science and Art

1855
...roots, O Tamarack ! Of your fibrous roots, O Larch Tree ! My canoe to bind together, So to bind the ends together That the water may not enter, That the river may not wet me !" And the larch, with all its fibres, Shivered in the air of morning. , Touched his forehead with its tassels,...
Full view - About this book

Putnam's Magazine: Original Papers on Literature, Science, Art ..., Volume 6

1855
...roots, O Tamarack ! Of your fibrous roots, O Larch Tree ! My canoe to bind together, So to bind the cuds together That the water may not enter, That the river may not wet me !" And the larch, with all its fibres. Shivered in the air of morning. Touched his forehead with its tassels,...
Full view - About this book

Putnam's Monthly, Volume 6

1855
...Closely sowed the bark together, Bound it closely to the framework. "Give me of your balm, О Fir-Tree! Of your balsam and your resin, So to close the seams together That the water mny not enter, That the river may not vet me !" And the fir-tree, tall and sombre, Sobbed through all...
Full view - About this book

The Christian remembrancer; or, The Churchman's Biblical, ecclesiastical ...

1856
...Closely sewed the bark together, Bound it closely to the framework. "Give me of your balm, O FirTree ! Of your balsam and your resin, So to close the seams...Answered wailing, answered weeping, "Take my balm, O Hiawatha! " * * Thus the Birch-Canoe was builded In the valley, by the river, In the bosom...
Full view - About this book

The Poetical Works of Henry W[adsworth] Longfellow, Volume 2

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow - 1856
...Closely sewed the bark together, Bound it closely to the framework. " Give me of your balm , O Fir-Tree ! Of your balsam and your resin , So to close the seams together That the water may not entet , That the river may not wet me | " And the Fir-Tree, tall and sombre, Sobbed through all its...
Full view - About this book

The New monthly magazine and universal register. [Continued as] The New ...

1856
...Hiawatha killed his first roebuck, when " like a wasp it buzzed and stung him ;" the Fir- Tree that, tall and sombre, " sobbed through all its robes of darkness, rattled like a shore with pebbles ;" the squirrel sitting on the bows of the canoe, with tail erected, while "in his fur the breeze of...
Full view - About this book

The Christian Remembrancer, Volume 31

William Scott, Francis Garden, James Bowling Mozley - Christianity - 1856
...I shaped them, Of your fibrous roots, O LarchTree ! My canoe to bind together, So to bind the ends together That the water may not enter, That the river may not wet me ! " And the Larch, with all its fibres, Shivered in the air of morning, Touched his forehead with its tassels,...
Full view - About this book

Mercersburg Quarterly Review, Volume 8

Reformed Church - 1856
...strong and pliant branches, My canoe to make more steady, Make more strong and firm beneath me."— " That the water may not enter, That the river may not wet me." Thus far the verse of the two poems — rhymeless trochaic dimeter with Oriental repetitions — is...
Full view - About this book

A Third Class Reader: Consisting of Extracts in Prose and Verse, for the Use ...

George Stillman Hillard - Readers - 1857 - 182 pages
...sewed the bark together, . Bound it closely to the framework. " Give me of your balm, O Fir Tree ! Of your balsam and your resin, So to close the seams...not enter, That the river may not wet me ! " And the Fir Tree, tall and sombre, Sobbed through all its robes of darkness, Rattled like a shore with pebbles,...
Full view - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download PDF