The History of Barbados: From the First Discovery of the Island, in the Year 1605, Till the Accession of Lord Seaforth, 1801

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J. Mawman, 1808 - Barbados - 668 pages
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Contents

I
1
II
48
III
76
IV
115
V
145
VI
167
VII
200
VIII
244
XI
302
XII
338
XIII
363
XIV
405
XV
457
XVI
490
XVII
526
XIX
558

IX
271
XX
608

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Page 444 - For the same reason, therefore, that honours are in the disposal of the king, offices ought to be so likewise; and as the king may create new titles, so may he create new offices: but with this restriction, that he cannot create new offices with new fees annexed to them, nor annex new fees to old offices; for this would be a tax upon the subject, which cannot be imposed but by act of parliament.
Page 398 - ... power but that of rejecting; they will not permit the least alteration or amendment to be made by the lords to the mode of taxing the people by a money bill; under which appellation are included all bills by which money is directed to be raised upon the subject, for any purpose or in any shape whatsoever...
Page 42 - But Las Casas, from the inconsistency natural to men who hurry with headlong impetuosity towards a favourite point, was incapable of making this distinction.
Page 3 - But such as, at this day, to Indians known, In Malabar or Decan spreads her arms, Branching so broad and long, that in the ground The bended twigs take root, and daughters grow About the mother tree, a pillar'd shade, High overarch'd, and echoing walks between...
Page 376 - Ordinary service must be secured by the motives to ordinary integrity. I do not hesitate to say, that that state which lays its foundation in rare and heroic virtues, will be sure to have its superstructure in the basest profligacy and corruption. An honourable and fair profit is the best security .against avarice and rapacity ; as in all things else, a lawful and regulated enjoyment is the best security against debauchery and excess.
Page 130 - Fourth wished that he might live to see a fowl in the pot of every peasant in his kingdom. That sentiment of homely benevolence was worth all the splendid sayings that are recorded of kings. But he wished perhaps for more than could be obtained, and the goodness of the man exceeded the power of the king. But this gentleman, a subject, may this day say this at least, with...
Page 207 - In every court there must be at least three constituent parts, the actor, reus, and judcx : the actor, or plaintiff, who complains of an injury done; the reus} or defendant, who is called upon to make satisfaction for it; and the judex...
Page 350 - It will be sufficient to observe, that the whole of the law and custom of parliament has its original from this one maxim, " that whatever matter arises concerning either house of parliament, ought to be examined, discussed, and adjudged in that house to which it relates, and not elsewhere (u).
Page 56 - ... weake, to be forced or persuaded to so ignoble a submission, and we cannot think, that there are any amongst us, who are soe simple, and soe unworthily minded, that they would not rather chuse a noble death, than forsake their old liberties and privileges.
Page 44 - An English ship having put into a bay sent some of her men ashore to try what victuals or water they could find; but the Indians, perceiving them to go far into the country, intercepted them on their return, and fell upon them, chasing them into a wood, where some were taken and some killed. A young man, whose name was Inkle...

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