Tree Hollows and Wildlife Conservation in Australia

Front Cover
Csiro Publishing, 2002 - Science - 211 pages
More than 300 species of Australian native animals-mammals, birds, reptiles and amphibians-use tree hollows, but there has never been a complete inventory of them. Many of these species are threatened, or are in decline, because of land-use practices such as grazing, timber production and firewood collection.All forest management agencies in Australia attempt to reduce the impact of logging on hollow-dependent fauna, but the nature of our eucalypt forests presents a considerable challenge. In some cases, tree hollows suitable for vertebrate fauna may take up to 250 years to develop, which makes recruiting and perpetuating this resource very difficult within the typical cycle of human-induced disturbance regimes. "Tree Hollows and Wildlife Conservation in Australia" is the first comprehensive account of the hollow-dependent fauna of Australia and introduces a considerable amount of new data on this subject. It not only presents a review and analysis of the literature, but also provides practical approaches for land management. Features* A unique single resource on tree hollows * Introduces new data * Provides practical approaches for management
 

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Contents

Predicting the likelihood that hollows are suitable for occupancy
66
A generic model for identifying trees suitable for occupancy by hollowusing
75
Other considerations when selecting hollowbearing trees for retention
85
HOLLOW NUMBERS AND FAUNA POPULATIONS
91
Implications for fauna
99
Principles for management 106
6
PERPETUATING HOLLOWS 115
15
Selecting recruitment trees 131
31
Native species with expanded ranges or increased population sizes 137
37
CONCLUDING REMARKS 151
52
Appendix A 156
75
References 182
83
Index
96
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

Philip Gibbons has worked as a forest ecologist for the past fourteen years for both State and Federal Governments. .

David Lindenmayer is an ecologist and conservation biologist with over 20 years experience in working in Australian forests, woodlands and studying native vertebrates. He was awarded the Eureka Prize for Environmental Research and the Australian Natural History Medal. He has published more than 380 scientific articles and 14 books on a wide range of topics associated with environmental science and conservation biology.

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