Plant lore, legends and lyrics

Front Cover
Sampson, Low, 1884 - 610 pages
 

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Contents

II
III
IV
7
V
19
VII
24
IX
38
X
62
XI
72
XXV
325
XXVI
344
XXVII
354
XXVIII
381
XXIX
387
XXX
394
XXXI
398
XXXII
419

XII
80
XIII
89
XIV
103
XV
114
XVI
134
XVIII
152
XIX
162
XX
174
XXI
234
XXII
260
XXIII
303
XXIV
311
XXXIII
453
XXXIV
459
XXXV
476
XXXVI
502
XXXVII
503
XXXVIII
528
XXXIX
554
XL
565
XLI
566
XLII
576
XLIII
582

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Popular passages

Page 515 - King Lear ' : — " How fearful And dizzy 'tis to cast one's eyes so low ! The crows and choughs that wing the midway air Show scarce so gross as beetles : half-way down Hangs one that gathers Samphire— dreadful trade 1 Methinks he seems no bigger than his head.
Page 62 - And I serve the Fairy queen, To dew her orbs upon the green : The Cowslips tall her pensioners be; In their gold coats spots you see ; Those be rubies, fairy favours : In those freckles live their savours.
Page 182 - brought a mixture of Myrrh and Aloes, about an hundred pound weight. Then took they the body of Jesus, and wound it in linen clothes with the spices, as the manner of Jews is to bury.
Page 202 - Where falls not hail, or rain, or any snow, Nor ever wind blows loudly, but it lies Deep-meadowed, happy, fair with orchard lawns, And bowery hollows crowned with Summer sea.
Page 52 - I will plant in the wilderness the Cedar, the Shittah tree and the Myrtle, and the Oil tree ; I will set in the desert the Fir tree and the Pine, and the Box tree together (xli., 19). The glory of Lebanon shall come unto
Page 532 - and the fact has been dramatised by Shakspeare, that Glo'ster, when he was contemplating the death of Hastings, asked the Bishop of Ely for Strawberries. "My lord of Ely, when I was last in Holborn, I saw good Strawberries in your garden there.
Page 196 - down they cast Their crowns, inwove with Amaranth and gold— Immortal Amaranth, a flower which once In Paradise, fast by the tree of life, Began to bloom, but soon for man's offence To heaven removed, where first it grew.
Page 341 - We have been rambling all this night, And almost all this day; And now returned back again. We've brought you a branch of May. " A branch of May we have brought you, And at your door it stands ; It is but a sprout, but it's well budded out By the work of our Lord's hands.
Page 462 - Fetch me that flower — the herb I showed thee once; The juice of it, on sleeping eyelids laid, Will make or man or woman madly dote Upon the next live creature that it sees.
Page 432 - is grown, it is the greatest among herbs, and becometh a tree, so that the birds of the air come and lodge in the branches thereof

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