Education, Volume 38

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New England Publishing Company, 1918 - Education
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Page 718 - High birth, vigour of bone, desert in service, Love, friendship, charity, are subjects all To envious and calumniating time. One touch of nature makes the whole world kin...
Page 778 - Yet I doubt not through the ages one increasing purpose runs, And the thoughts of men are widened with the process of the suns.
Page 408 - Conscience in the midst of every reasonable soul as a light whereby he may divine and know what he ought to do, and what he ought not to do. Wherefore, forasmuch as it behoveth thee to be occupied in such things as pertain to the law, it is necessary that thou ever hold a pure and clean conscience.
Page 487 - Each of us inevitable, Each of us limitless— each of us with his or her right upon the earth, Each of us allow'd the eternal purports of the earth, Each of us here as divinely as any is here.
Page 718 - For honour travels in a strait so narrow, Where one but goes abreast. Keep then the path ; For emulation hath a thousand sons, That one by one pursue ; if you give way, Or hedge aside from the direct forthright, Like to an entered tide, they all rush by, And leave you hindmost.
Page 34 - If we survey the pedagogy of Luther in all its extent," says Dittes, " and imagine it fully realized in practice, what a splendid picture the schools and education of the sixteenth century would present ! We should have courses of study, text-books, teachers, methods, principles, and modes of discipline, schools and school regulations, that could serve as models for our own age. But, alas ! Luther, like all great men, was little understood by his age and adherents; and what was understood was inadequately...
Page 12 - It includes not only the narrow conception of instruction, to which it was formerly limited, but embraces all forms of human experience, owing to the recognition of the fact that every stimulus with its corresponding reaction has a definite effect upon character. It may be either mainly esthetic, ethical, intellectual, physical, or technical, but to be most satisfactory, it must involve and develop all these sides of human capacity.
Page 597 - Bear constantly in mind the truth that the aim of your discipline should be to produce a self-governing being ; not to produce a being to be governed by others.
Page 32 - If the government can compel such citizens as are fit for military service to bear spear and rifle, to mount ramparts and perform other martial duties in time of war, how much more has it a right to compel the people to send their children to school...
Page 187 - Inches. Manuscripts not easily legible will not be considered. The name of the writer must not appear on the essay, which should be accompanied by a letter giving the writer's name, school and home address, and sent to Mrs. Fannie Fern Andrews...

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