The Count of Monte Cristo

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Penguin Books Limited, Mar 27, 2003 - Fiction - 1276 pages
1596 Reviews
Alexandre Dumas' epic tale of suffering and revenge inspired by a real-life case of wrongful imprisonment, the Penguin Classics edition of The Count of Monte Cristo is translated with an introduction by Robin Buss. Thrown in prison for a crime he has not committed Edmond Dantès spends fourteen bitter years imprisoned in the grim fortress of If. There he learns of a great hoard of treasure hidden on the Isle of Monte Cristo and becomes determined not only to escape, but also to unearth the treasure and use it to plot the destruction of the three men responsive for his incarceration. No longer the naïve sailor who disappeared into the dungeon all those years ago, he reinvents himself as the charming, mysterious and powerful Count of Monte Cristo. A huge popular success when it was first serialized in the 1840s, The Count of Monte Cristo has been a fixture of western literature ever since, and the subject of countless film and TV adaptations. Robin Buss' lively translation is complete and unabridged, and remains faithful to the style of Dumas' original. This edition also includes an introduction, explanatory notes, a new chronology and updated suggestions for further reading. Alexandre Dumas (1802-70) was a pioneer of Romantic theatre in France, but in 1839 he turned his attention to writing the novels for which he is best known today, pften using collaborators such as Auguste Maquet to suggest plots or historical background. His most famous works include The Three Musketeers (1844), The Count of Monte Cristo (1844-5) and The Man in the Iron Mask (1847). If you enjoyed The Count of Monte Cristo you might enjoy Robert Louis Stevenson's Kidnapped, also available in Penguin Classics. 'What makes The Count Of Monte Cristo such a superior story is that revenge is not the only emotion driving the plot ... it is an almost perfect story - also in the mix are love, friendship, jealousy, faith, education, snobbery and class'Sunday Express 'The greatest of escape stories'Guardian

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The author also provides detailed imagery and allo - Goodreads
There were also some good action scenes in this book. - Goodreads
However, he has two rivals that plot to frame him. - Goodreads

Review: The Count of Monte Cristo

User Review  - Adrian White - Goodreads

One of the best narratives I've ever read. An astounding first 300 pages, followed by a worrying 100 or so pages as I thought it was going to deteriorate into a Huckleberry Finn-type episodic ... Read full review

Review: The Count of Monte Cristo

User Review  - Ulia - Goodreads

"All human wisdom is contained in these two words:"wait"and "hope"! It was a bit hard to get through this one,but it's a great read ,and I recommend it to all. Read full review

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About the author (2003)

Alexandre Dumas was born in 1802 at Villers-Cotterêts. His father, the illegitimate son of a marquis, was a general in the Revolutionary armies, but died when Dumas was only four. He was brought up in straitened circumstances and received very little education. He joined the household of the future king, Louis-Philippe, and began reading voraciously. Later he entered the cénacle of Charles Nodier and started writing.

In 1829 the production of his play, Henri III et sa Cour, heralded twenty years of successful playwriting. In 1839 he turned his attention to writing historical novels, often using collaborators such as Auguste Maquet to suggest plots or historical background. His most successful novels are The Count of Monte Cristo, which appeared during 1844-5, and The Three Musketeers, published in 1844. Other novels deal with the wars of religion and the Revolution. Dumas wrote many of these for the newspapers, often in daily instalments, marshalling his formidable energies to produce ever more in order to pay off his debts. In addition, he wrote travel books, children's stories and his Mémoires which describe most amusingly his early life, his entry into Parisian literary circles and the 1830 Revolution. He died in 1870.

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