Domestic Annals of Scotland: From the Reformation to the Rebellion of 1745

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Chambers, 1885 - Scotland - 416 pages
 

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Page 340 - And all the host of heaven shall be dissolved, And the heavens shall be rolled together as a scroll: And all their host shall fall down, As the leaf falleth off from the vine, And as a falling fig from the fig tree. For my sword shall be bathed in heaven: Behold, it shall come down upon Idumea, And upon the people of my curse, to judgment.
Page 276 - The southwest counties of Scotland have seldom corn enough to serve them round the year; and the northern parts producing more than they need, those in the west come in the Summer to buy at Leith the stores that come from the north; and from a word, whiggam, used in driving their horses, all that drove were called the whiggamors, and shorter the whiggs.
Page 276 - ... their people to rise and march to Edinburgh; and they came up marching on the head of their parishes with an unheard-of fury, praying and preaching all the way as they came. The marquis of Argyle and his party came and headed them, they being about six thousand. This was called the whiggamor's inroad; and ever after that, all that opposed the court came in contempt to be called whigs...
Page 200 - I had remained a while for want of blood, I lost my sight, and withal as I then thought, my life also. But strong water and his diligence quickly recovered me, when I escaped a great danger. For my lord's surgeon, when nobody dreamt of it, came full at me with his lord's sword ; and had not mine with my sword interposed himself, I had been slain by those base hands ; although my lord Bruce, weltering in his blood, and past all expectation of life, conformable to all his former carriage, which was...
Page 241 - Sutherland, and near cousin to the marquis, busked in a •white plaid, and riding on a small nag, having a boy leading her horse, without any more in her company, in this pitiful manner she came weeping and mourning to the Bog, desiring entry to speak with my lord, but this was refused, so she returned back to her own house the same gate she came, comfortless.
Page 221 - ... the brain. The smoke of it is one of the wholesomest scents that is against all contagious airs, for it o'ermasters all other smells, as King James, they say, found true when, being once ahunting, a shower of rain drove him into a pigsty for shelter, where he caused a pipeful to be taken on purpose.
Page 198 - States' territories from the archduke's. And there was the destined stage, to the end that having ended, he that could, might presently exempt himself from the justice of the country, by retiring into the dominion not offended. It was...
Page 111 - ... a very reverend man of big stature, and grave and stout countenance, gray-haired, and very humble-like, wha, after mcikle and very low courtesy, bowing down with his face near the ground, and touching my shoe with his hand, began his harangue in the Spanish tongue...
Page 154 - ... many servants to attend him, that brought in his meat with their heads covered with blue caps, the table being more than half furnished with great platters of porridge, each having a little piece of sodden meat; and when the table was served, the servants did sit down with us ; but the upper mess instead of porridge, had a pullet with some prunes in the broth.
Page 199 - I freed my long-captivated weapon; which incontinently levying at his throat, being master still of his, I demanded if he would ask his life, or yield his sword ; both which, though in that imminent danger, he bravely denied to do.

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