How Not to Play Chess

Front Cover
Courier Corporation, 1961 - Games - 119 pages
1 Review
Beginners and even fairly advanced players agree on one thing: analyzing the strength or weakness of a position (material being equal) is the hardest part of chess to learn. It is also one of the hardest elements to teach, and there are some who claim it is unteachable. But this wonderfully lucid book, written by one of the outstanding chess expositors of this century, presents the basis of analysis in such a disarmingly simple way that even the most casual player will be able to improve his game immensely.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - lunarcheck - LibraryThing

This book was originally a lecture about playing chess and analyzing chess positions which was expanded into a book. It's not really a book to keep but it was certainly worth reading once. It's old so it's in descriptive notation (1.P-K4). But hey you've got to love the title. Read full review

Contents

III
15
IV
22
V
25
VI
29
VII
34
VIII
35
IX
36
X
38
XVII
57
XVIII
58
XIX
60
XX
61
XXI
64
XXII
69
XXIII
71
XXIV
76

XI
39
XII
42
XIII
45
XIV
48
XV
51
XVI
54
XXV
81
XXVI
82
XXVII
91
XXVIII
101
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About the author (1961)

Fred Reinfeld (1910-1964) was for many years among the strongest chess players in the country. Even now as an author, he stands alone, the most successful and prolific chess writer of all time, with over 100 books to his credit.

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