The Invention That Changed the World: How a Small Group of Radar Pioneers Won the Second World War and Launched a Technological Revolution

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Touchstone, Mar 23, 1998 - Science - 576 pages
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The magnetron's arrival triggered the most dramatic mobilization of science in history as America's top scientists enlisted in the "war within the war" to convert the British invention into a potent military weapon. Developed in a top-secret rush at the Radiation Lab on the campus of MIT, microwave radars eventually helped destroy Japanese warships in the Pacific, brought down Nazi buzz bombs over England, and enabled Allied bombers to "see" through cloud cover over Germany and Japan.

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User Review  - Ohjai - LibraryThing

I found [The Invention That Changed the World] very interesting. It provided me the chronological order of the development of RADAR as viewed through the eyes of the MIT Radiation Lab in World War II ... Read full review

THE INVENTION THAT CHANGED THE WORLD: How a Small Group of Radar Pioneers Won the Second World War and Launched a Technological Revolution

User Review  - Kirkus

In a narrative that often reads as compellingly as the best spy fiction, freelance science writer Buderi tells the story of how British and American scientists developed microwave radar, a device that ... Read full review

Contents

I
27
II
38
III
52

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About the author (1998)

Robert Buderi, a Fellow in MIT's Center for International Studies, is the author of two acclaimed books, Engines of Tomorrow, about corporate innovation, and The Invention That Changed the World, about a secret lab at MIT in World War II. He lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

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