St. John Chrysostom Commentary on the Psalms, Volume 2

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Holy Cross Orthodox Press, 1998 - Bible - 387 pages
While St. John Chrysostom may have commented on all 150 psalms in the Psalter, commentary has survived on only fifty-eight. In these volumes, Robert Charles Hill has prepared an excellent translation of the commentary - in Volume One Psalms 4-13, 44-50, and in Volume Two Psalms 109-150 (with the exception of the long Ps 119) - all appearing for the first time in English. In this work, probably composed while he was still in Antioch, Chrysostom's brilliance as an exegete of the "literal school" of Antioch shines forth, even as he works with the metaphorical language and imagery of the psalms. As Hill writes, "it is fascinating to watch Chrysostom . . . coming to grips with this lyrical material, achieving some sense of comfort, and eventually devising - for the first time? - his own hermeneutical principles for coping with such texts." The extensive Introduction in Volume One covers basic issues on the commentary, including its origins, its relationship to Chrysostom's other exegetical work, his attitude to Scripture, and the theology, spirituality and other moral accents of the commentary. Comment on Chrysostom's text is also given in endnotes, and indexes are provided in each volume. -- ‡c From publisher's description

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Contents

Psalm 109
12
Psalm 111
36
54
112
Copyright

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About the author (1998)

John Chrysostom, born at Antioch towards 347, was a great genius and his poweful eloquence earned him the surname of Chrysostom, or golden mouthed. He is known for his preaching, exegesis, and liturgical reforms. His skills were especially directed to the instruction and moral reformation of the people of Antioch. In terms of scriptural exegesis, he spoke for a literal interpretation of the text against the allegorical school that was prominent in Alexandria. With St. Athanasius, St. Gregory of Nazianzen, and St. Basil, he forms the group of the four great doctors of the Eastern Church. In 398 he became Patriarch of Constantinople. His courage in branding vice caused him to be exiled and ill-treated. John Chrysostom died at Comana in Pontus on September 14, 407.

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