United States and Vietnam 1787-1941

Front Cover
DIANE Publishing, 1990 - 324 pages
As efforts continue to settle the Cambodia-Laos issue, Vietnam is again a focus of American attention. With the passage of time since the United States pulled out of Vietnam, American policy makers have begun approaching the major Indochinese issues from new perspectives, particularly new perspectives toward that general region. As is so often the case, history, by informing, may also help illuminate these issues. In this book, Ambassador Robert Hopkins Miller, a diplomat with considerable experience in Southeast Asia, presents the early history of United States-Vietnam relations. In 1787, President Thomas Jefferson first showed an interest in the region -- then call Cochinchina -- for the purpose of trading for rice. From this beginning, Miller traces the ebb and flow of U.S. diplomatic, economic, and strategic interests in Vietnam until Pearl Harbor, on December 7, 1941. Amply illustrated with excerpts from contemporary correspondence and official documents, the research shows Vietnam's intricate relationship with China, the gradually increasing commercial involvement of the Western powers, and the impact of Japan's expansionist policy. The chapters building up to World War II are particularly informative as they demonstrate, among other matters, the responsibility of national leaders to identify unambiguous political aims. A chronology of events occurring between the United States and Vietnam from 1787 to December 7, 1941 is included.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

VII
3
VIII
5
IX
6
X
10
XI
12
XII
15
XIII
17
XIV
19
XXVII
80
XXVIII
87
XXIX
89
XXX
102
XXXI
122
XXXII
137
XXXIII
151
XXXIV
154

XVI
20
XVII
21
XVIII
26
XIX
27
XX
34
XXI
41
XXII
44
XXIII
46
XXIV
55
XXV
57
XXVI
66
XXXV
159
XXXVII
174
XXXVIII
175
XXXIX
192
XL
217
XLI
234
XLII
265
XLIII
287
XLIV
297
XLV
315
XLVI
324

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 160 - Policy; and that it does not intend to recognize any situation, treaty, or agreement which may be brought about by means contrary to the covenants and obligations of the Pact of Paris of August 27, 1928, to which treaty both China and Japan, as well as the United States, are parties.
Page 312 - ... if any other nation should act unjustly or oppressively, the United States will exert their good offices, on being informed of the case, to bring about an amicable arrangement of the question, thus showing their friendly feelings.
Page 245 - Japan that if the Japanese Government takes any further steps in pursuance of a policy or program of military domination by force or threat of force of neighboring countries, the Government of the United States will be compelled to take immediately any and all steps which it may deem necessary toward safe-guarding the legitimate rights and interests of the United States and American nationals and toward insuring the safety and security of the United States.
Page 59 - It is the President's opinion that steps should be taken at once to enable our enterprising merchants to supply the last link in that great chain which unites all nations of the world, by the early establishment of a line of steamers from California to China.
Page 262 - Only in situations of extraordinary importance to our two countries need I address to Your Majesty messages on matters of state. I feel I should now so address you because of the deep and far-reaching emergency which appears to be in formation.
Page 263 - I address myself to Your Majesty at this moment in the fervent hope that Your Majesty may, as I am doing, give thought in this definite emergency to ways of dispelling the dark clouds. I am confident that both of us, for the sake of the peoples not only of our own great countries...
Page 258 - Indo-China upon either the restoration of peace between Japan and China or the establishment of an equitable peace in the Pacific area.
Page 292 - Intervention in the domestic affairs of the Netherlands Indies or any alteration of their status quo by other than peaceful processes would be prejudicial to the cause of stability, peace, and security not only in the region of the Netherlands Indies but in the entire Pacific area.
Page 222 - Embassy was told by my . . . colleague that from many quarters, including a Japanese one, he had heard that a surprise mass attack on Pearl Harbor was planned by the Japanese Military forces, in case of "trouble" between Japan and the United States ; that the attack would involve the use of all the Japanese military facilities.
Page 19 - May 30, 1834.. To the Senate of the United States: It having been represented to me by persons whose statements and opinions were thought worthy of confidence that the trade of the United States might be extended and rendered more lucrative by commercial arrangements with the countries bordering on the Indian Ocean, and being informed that the success of any efforts which might be made to accomplish that object would materially depend upon the secrecy with which they should be conducted, I appointed...

References to this book

All Book Search results »

Bibliographic information