The Life of Abraham Lincoln Drawn from Original Sources and Containing Many Speeches, Letters, and Telegrams Hitherto Unpublished: And Illustrated with Many Reproductions from Original Paintings, Photographs, Etc, Volume 4

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Lincoln historical society, 1907
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Page 18 - Fondly do we hope, fervently do we pray, that this mighty scourge of war may speedily pass away. Yet, if God wills that it continue until all the wealth piled by the bondman's two hundred and fifty years of unrequited toil shall be sunk, and until every drop of blood drawn with the lash shall be paid by another drawn with the sword, as was said three thousand years ago, so still it must be said, "The judgments of the Lord are true and righteous altogether.
Page 17 - Now, at the end of three years' struggle, the nation's condition is not what either party, or any man, devised or expected. God alone can claim it. \Vhither it is tending seems plain. If God now wills the removal of a great wrong, and wills also that we of the North, as well as you of the South, shall pay fairly for our complicity in that wrong, impartial history will find therein new cause to attest and revere the justice and goodness of God.
Page 18 - Woe unto the world because of offenses! for it must needs be that offenses come; but woe to that man by whom the offense cometh.
Page 16 - We all agree that the seceded States, so called, are out of their proper, practical relation with the Union, and that the sole object of the government, civil and military, in regard to those States, is to again get them into that proper practical relation.
Page 12 - It is not claimed that the election has imposed a duty on members to change their views or their votes any further than as an additional element to be considered, their judgment may be affected by it. It is the voice of the people now for the first time heard upon the question. In a great national crisis like ours, unanimity of action among those seeking a common end is very desirable — almost indispensable. And yet no approach to such unanimity is attainable unless some deference shall be paid...
Page 116 - This is a world of compensation and he who would be no slave must consent to have no slave. Those who deny freedom to others deserve it not for themselves; and under a just God, cannot long retain it.

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