The genealogy of the Brainerd family in the United States: with numerous sketches of individuals

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J. F. Trow, printer, 1857 - 303 pages
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Page 274 - Oct. 2. My soul was this day, at turns, sweetly set on God : I longed to be with him, that I might behold his glory. I felt sweetly disposed to commit all to him, even my dearest friends, my dearest flock, my absent brother, and all my concerns for time and eternity. Oh that his kingdom might come in the world ; that they might all love and glorify. him, for what he is in himself; and that the blessed Redeemer might " see of the travail of his soul, and be satisfied ! Oh, come, Lord Jesus, come quickly...
Page 23 - And wakes thee from the calmness of thy rest. Down sweeps the torrent ice, it may not stay By rock or bridge, in narrow or in bay — Swift, swifter to the heaving sea it goes, And leaves thee dimpling in thy sweet repose. Yet as the...
Page 22 - The mountain torrent, with its wintry roar Springs from its home and leaps upon thy shore : The promontories love thee — and for this Turn their rough cheeks and stay thee for thy kiss. Stern, at thy source, thy northern Guardians stand...
Page 259 - College, that I did not believe he had any more grace than the chair I then leaned upon: I humbly confess, that herein I have sinned against God, and acted contrary to the rules of His Word, and have injured Mr.
Page 275 - Father of mercies ; not with florid expressions or a studied eloquence ; not with any intemperate vehemence or indecent boldness ; at the greatest distance from any appearance of ostentation, and from every thing that might look as though he meant to recommend himself to those that were about him, or set himself off to their acceptance ; free, too, from vain repetitions, without impertinent excursions or needless multiplying of words.
Page 25 - tarrying" stranger feel That next to home, here best may he abide, To rest and cheer him by the chimney-side ; Drink the hale Farmer's cider, as he hears From the gray dame the tales of other years. Cracking his shag-barks, as the aged crone —Mixing the true and doubtful into one — Tells how the Indian...
Page 23 - Here his young squaw her cradling tree would choose, Singing her chant to hush her swart pappoose, Here stain her quills and string her trinkets rude, And weave her warrior's wampum in the wood. — No more shall they thy welcome waters bless, No more their forms thy moon-lit banks shall press, No more be heard, from mountain or from grove, His whoop of slaughter, or her song of love. ON CONNECTICUT EIVER. 57 Thou didst not shake...
Page 252 - ... gave great attention to the word preached, and endeavoured to my utmost to retain it. So much concerned was I about religion, that I agreed with some young persons to meet privately on Sabbath evenings for religious exercises, and thought myself sincere in these duties; and after our meeting was ended, I used to repeat the discourses of the day to myself; recollecting what I could, though sometimes very late at night. I used...
Page 29 - The carbuncle lies in the deep, deep sea, Beneath the mighty wave ; But the light shines upward so gloriously, That the sailor looks pale, and forgets his glee, When he crosses the wizard's grave...
Page 260 - I have often reflected on this act with grief; I hope on account of the sin of it; and am willing to lie low, and be abased before God and man for it I humbly ask the forgiveness of the governors of the college, and of the whole society ; but of Mr.

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