Cratylus

Front Cover
Hackett Publishing, Jan 1, 1998 - Philosophy - 103 pages
4 Reviews
The Cratylus, Plato's sole dialogue devoted to the relation between language and reality, is acknowledged to be one of his masterpieces. But owing to its often enigmatic content no more than a handful of passages from it have played a part in the global evaluation of Plato's philosophy. This new English translation by C D C Reeve is the first since 1926, and incomparably the most helpful and accessible now available. It opens up the Cratylus to all philosophically interested readers, as well as to cultural historians and to those whose primary concern is the history of linguistics. The full and lucid introduction does much to illuminate the internal dynamic of this important text and to explain its place within Plato's oeuvre.
 

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Review: Cratylus

User Review  - Goodreads

It was very clever, and I learned a bit from it. However, I found myself getting a bit bored with it towards the end. Great from a linguistic point of view though. Read full review

Review: Cratylus

User Review  - Goodreads

Although the majority of text I skimmed over and that I thought most of the arguments were fundamentally wrong, I do still read Plato. I find his overall un-ending questioning; his lack of a ... Read full review

Contents

PREFACE
ix
INTRODUCTION
xi
1 Hermogenes and Cratylus on Names
xii
2 Natures Actions and the Truth in Names
xiv
3 The Maker of Names
xix
4 Natures and Forms Names and Shuttles
xxi
5 Homer on the Correctness of Names
xxiii
6 The Testimony of Names Themselves
xxvi
9 Cratylus on Truth Falsity and Fitting
xxxvi
10 Convention Returns
xl
11 Knowledge and Instruction
xlii
12 Heracliteanism
xliv
13 Socrates on the Correctness of Names
xlvii
PLATOS CRATYLUS
1
SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY
97
INDEX OF NAMES DISCUSSED IN THE CRATYLUS
101

7 The Etymologies
xxx
8 Primary Names
xxxiii

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About the author (1998)

C. D. C. Reeve is Delta Kappa Epsilon Distinguished Professor of Philosophy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

Bibliographic information