Selections from the Sources of English History: Being a Supplement to Text-books of English History B.C. 55-A.D. 1832, Part 1832

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Charles William Colby
Longmans, Green, & Company, 1899 - Great Britain - 325 pages
 

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Contents

Alfreds Wars with the Danes
22
A Letter from Canute to his People
24
The Guild of St Peters at Abbotsbury
27
The Battle of Stamford Bridge
29
Saxons and Normans
33
Gregory VII to William the Conqueror
36
Domesday Book
38
The Conquerors Character
39
The First Crusade
41
A Sudden Campaign of William Bufus
44
The Charter of Liberties
46
The Wreck of the White Ship
49
Adulterine Castles in the Beign of Stephen
52
The First Norman Invasion of Ireland
53
The Murder of Becket
56
The Burning and Bebuilding of Canterbury Cathedral
59
William FitzStephens Description of London
63
The Sufferings of the Mediasval Jew
66
The Prowess of Ooeur de Lion
68
A Town Charter
70
The Interdict
72
The Extortion of Magna Carta
74
The Attitude of St Albans Chroniclers towards Henry III
78
The Difficulties of the Mediaeval Scholar
83
The Manumission of a Villein
87
A Summons to Parliament in 1295
89
An English View of Wallace and Bruce
90
The Price of Food under Edward II
92
Troubles at Bristol
93
The Failure of the Bardi
97
The Black Death
101
A Bull of Gregory XL against John Wyclif
103
Wat Tylers Rebellion
105
A Scene in Parliament
109
A Beluctant Alderman Ill 45 Joan of Arcs Trial
113
A Proclamation of Bichard Duke of York
117
A Marriage Negotiation in the Fifteenth Century
119
The Princes in the Tower
122
Diversities of English Speech in 1385 and 1490
126
A Venetian View of English Society
129
John Cabots First Voyage
133
The Revival of Learning in England
135
A Venetian Ambassadors Impression of Henry VIII and Wolsey
137
A Letter of Wolsey to Pace
140
Sheep Walks
142
An Oath of Allegiance to Henry VIII
145
The Suppression of Glastonbury Abbey
147
An Edict against Religious Innovations
150
Lady Jane Grey
152
The Loss of Calais
154
James I and the Puritans
181
The Voyage of the Mayflower
184
The First Draft of Charges against Strafford
188
Hampden
190
JTke Wonderful Work of God in the Guidance of Bullets
193
Tne Origin of the Royal Society
195
Cromwells Dissolution of the Long Parliament
199
Blake at Santa Cruz
200
The Restoration Festivities
203
The Fire of London
205
The CoffeeHouse
208
On the Growth of English Power and Wealth
212
Lord Jeffreys on the Bench
214
The Papal Nuncio
217
The Reaction against Roman Catholicism
219
Glencoe
220
Patersons Claims for the Bank of England
223
The Battle of Blenheim
226
The Union of England and Scotland
227
A South Sea Tract
229
The Drapier Letters
232
Bolingbroke and Walpole
235
The Opposition to John Wesley
237
30000 Reward for the Young Pretender
240
Life on Board a ManofWar
242
The Battle of Plassey
245
Wolfe before Quebec
247
The Earl of Chatham
250
No 45 of the North Briton
253
Junius to the Duke of Bedford
256
Burke on Conciliation with the Colonies
259
John Howard the Prison Reformer
261
Warren Hastings at the Council Board
264
The Steam Engine
268
The Crusade against Slavery
271
The Revolution Society
273
Foxs Eulogy of Washington
276
The Rate of Wages in 1795
278
The Battle of the Nile
281
Jenners Petition to Parliament
284
A Spirited State Paper
286
The Berlin Decree
289
The Peninsular War
292
English Feeling towards Napoleon after Waterloo
296
The Peterloo Massacre
298
Hole and Corner Surgery
300
OConnells Police
303
The Second Reading of the Reform Bill
306
The Duke of Wellington
308

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Page 153 - I am in presence either of father or mother, whether I speak, keep silence, sit, stand, or go, eat, drink, be merry or sad, be sewing, playing, dancing, or doing anything else, I must do it, as it were in such weight, measure, and number, even so perfectly as God made the world...
Page 159 - I know I have the body but of a weak and feeble woman; but I have the heart and stomach of a king, and of a king of England, too; and think foul scorn that Parma or Spain or any prince of Europe should dare to invade the borders of my realm...
Page 158 - My loving People, — We have been persuaded by some that are careful of our safety, to take heed how we commit ourselves to armed multitudes, for fear of treachery ; but I assure you, I do not desire to live to distrust my faithful and loving people.
Page 259 - Slavery they can have anywhere. It is a weed that grows in every soil. They may have it from Spain, they may have it from Prussia. But, until you become lost to all feeling of your true interest and your natural dignity, freedom they can have from none but you. This is the commodity of price, of which you have the monopoly. This is the true act of navigation, which binds to you the commerce of the colonies, and through them secures to you the wealth of the world.
Page 42 - And every one that hath forsaken houses, or brethren, or sisters, or father, or mother, or wife, or children, or lands, for my name's sake, shall receive an hundredfold, and shall inherit everlasting life.
Page 74 - No free man shall be taken, or imprisoned, or disseized, or outlawed, or exiled, or any wise destroyed; nor will we go upon him, nor send upon him, but by the lawful judgment of his peers or by the law of the land. To none will we sell, to none will we deny or delay, right or justice.
Page 260 - It is the love of the people ; it is their attachment to their government, from the sense of the deep stake they have in such a glorious institution, which gives you your army and your navy, and infuses into both that liberal obedience, without which your army would be a base rabble, and your navy nothing but rotten timber.
Page 207 - Having staid, and in an hour's time seen the fire rage every way ; and nobody, to my sight, endeavouring to quench it, but to remove their goods, and leave all to the fire...
Page 162 - And though you have had and may have many mightier and wiser princes sitting in this seat, yet you never had nor shall have any that will love you better.
Page 261 - Magnanimity in politics is not seldom the truest wisdom; and a great empire and little minds go ill together. If we are conscious of our...

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