A DOG OF FLANDERS AND OTHER STORIES

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Page 13 - The villagers gave him the employment a little out of charity — more because it suited them well to send their milk into the town by so honest a carrier, and bide at home themselves to look after their gardens, their cows, their poultry, or their little fields. But it was becoming hard work for the old man. He was eighty-three, and Antwerp was a good league off, or more. Patrasche watched the...
Page 15 - ... amusement to step out with this little light green cart, with its bright brass cans, by the side of the gentle old man who always paid him with a tender caress and with a kindly word. Besides, his work was over by three or four in the day; and after that time he was free to do as he would...
Page 60 - ... guided straight to the gates of the chancel, and, stretched there upon the stones, he found Nello. He crept up, and touched the face of the boy. "Didst thou dream that I should be faithless and forsake thee? I - a dog?" said that mute caress. The lad raised himself with a low cry and clasped him close. "Let us lie down and die together,
Page 63 - I was cruel to the lad," he muttered; " and now I would have made amends,—yea, to the half of my substance,—and he should have been to me as a son." There came also, as the day grew apace, a painter who had fame in the world, and who was liberal of hand and of spirit. " I seek one who should have had the prize yesterday had worth won," he said to the people—" a boy of rare promise and genius. An old wood-cutter on a fallen tree at eventide— that was all his theme; but there was greatness...
Page 52 - The doors of the inner hall were opened; the eager, panting throng rushed in. It was known that the selected picture would be raised above the rest upon a wooden dais. A mist obscured Nello's sight, his head swam, his limbs almost failed him. When his vision cleared he saw the drawing raised on high; it was not his own! A slow, sonorous voice was proclaiming aloud that victory had been adjudged to Stephen Kiesslinger, born in the burg of Antwerp, son of a wharfinger in that town.
Page 58 - ... companion; the house-mother sat with calm, contented face at the spinning-wheel; the cuckoo in the clock chirped mirthful hours. Amidst it all Patrasche was bidden with a thousand words of welcome to tarry there a cherished guest. But neither peace nor plenty could allure him where Nello was not. When the supper smoked on the board, and the voices were loudest and gladdest, and the Christ-child brought choicest gifts to Alois, Patrasche, watching always an occasion, glided out when the door was...
Page 12 - ... and health and strength returned, and Patrasche staggered up again upon his four stout, tawny legs. Now for many weeks he had been useless, powerless, sore, near to death: but all this time he had heard no rough word...
Page 37 - I took the portrait of Alois on a piece of pine: that is all." "Ah!" The old man was silent: the truth suggested itself to him with the boy's innocent answer. He was tied to a bed of dried leaves in the corner of a wattle hut, but he had not wholly forgotten what the ways of the world were like. He drew Nello's fair head fondly to his breast with a tenderer gesture. "Thou art very poor, my child," he said with a quiver the more in his aged, trembling voice, — "so poor!
Page 36 - Thou art too sick to leave," murmured the lad, bending his handsome young head over the bed. "Tut! tut! Mother Nulette would have come and sat with me, as she does scores of times. What is the cause, Nello?" the old man persisted. "Thou surely hast not had ill words with the little one?" "Nay, grandfather— never," said the boy quickly, with a hot color in his bent face.
Page 43 - Flemish plains, they found dropped in the road a pretty little puppet, a tambourine-player, all scarlet and gold, about six inches high, and, unlike greater personages when Fortune lets them drop, quite unspoiled and unhurt by its fall. It was a pretty toy. Nello tried to find its owner, and, failing, thought that it was just the thing to please Alois. It was quite night when he passed the millhouse : he knew the little window of her room. It could be no harm, he thought, if he gave her his little...

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