Makers of Rome, Nine Lives: Coriolanus, Fabius Maximus, Macellus, Cato the Elder, Tiberius Gracchus, Gaius Gracchus, Sertorius, Brutus, Mark Antony

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Penguin Books Limited, 1965 - Biography & Autobiography - 366 pages
25 Reviews
These nine biographies illuminate the careers, personalities and military campaigns of some of Rome’s greatest statesmen, whose lives span the earliest days of the Republic to the establishment of the Empire. Selected from Plutarch’s Roman Lives, they include prominent figures who achieved fame for their pivotal roles in Roman history, such as soldierly Marcellus, eloquent Cato and cautious Fabius. Here too are vivid portraits of ambitious, hot-tempered Coriolanus; objective, principled Brutus and open-hearted Mark Anthony, who would later be brought to life by Shakespeare. In recounting the lives of these great leaders, Plutarch also explores the problems of statecraft and power and illustrates the Roman people’s genius for political compromise, which led to their mastery of the ancient world.

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Review: Makers of Rome: Nine Lives

User Review  - Justin - Goodreads

Not being familiar with the works of Plutarch, I made the mistake of buying this abridged version rather than the complete Parallel Lives. This was the only problem I had with the book and I'm not ... Read full review

Review: Makers of Rome: Nine Lives

User Review  - Sean Michael - Goodreads

A wonderful collection of biographies. I am impressed by Plutarch's ability to describe the best and worst of each man, in particular in regards to Cato and Fabius. His dislike for Antony comes ... Read full review

About the author (1965)

Plutarch (c.50-c.120 AD) was a writer and thinker born into a wealthy, established family of Chaeronea in central Greece. He received the best possible education in rhetoric and philosophy, and traveled to Asia Minor and Egypt. Later, a series of visits to Rome and Italy contributed to his fame, which was given official recognition by the emperors Trajan and Hadrian. Plutarch rendered conscientious service to his province and city (where he continued to live), as well as holding a priesthood at nearby Delphi. His voluminous surviving writings are broadly divided into the 'moral' works and the Parallel Lives of outstanding Greek and Roman leaders. The former (Moralia) are a mixture of rhetorical and antiquarian pieces, together with technical and moral philosophy (sometimes in dialogue form). The Lives have been influential from the Renaissance onwards.

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