The Only Way to Cross

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Collier Books, 1978 - Business & Economics - 434 pages
16 Reviews
Sketches the history of transatlantic liners since the turn of the century, examining their design and innovations as well as their memorable passengers

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Review: The Only Way to Cross: The Golden Era of the Great Atlantic Liners - From the Mauretania to the France and the Queen Elizabeth 2

User Review  - Ralph - Goodreads

A very good description of cruise ships evolution from truly luxury liners to (not up to today's version of cruise ships) their decline as preferred means of trans-Atlantic crossing. Lots of pictures, detailed accounts of amenities, etc. Read full review

Review: The Only Way to Cross: The Golden Era of the Great Atlantic Liners - From the Mauretania to the France and the Queen Elizabeth 2

User Review  - Shawn Thrasher - Goodreads

I was excited to read this book, but overall disappointed. It felt like a self published book almost, sort of like a book of town history or genealogy, with an insider's perspective that was hard to ... Read full review

Contents

Atlantic Overture
1
Building the Mauretania
10
OlympicTitanic
44
Copyright

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About the author (1978)

John Kurtz Maxtone-Graham (August 2, 1929 - July 6, 2015) was a speaker and writer on ocean liners and maritime history. He was born in Orange, New Jersey and raised in Hoboken, New Jersey. He graduated from Brown University in 1951. He served in the United States Marine Corps during the Korean War and had once worked unsuccessfully as a Broadway stage manager. In 1972, he wrote his first book on ocean liners, The Only Way to Cross, to be followed by numerous other books for small publishing houses. France/Norway, was published in 2010, and in March 2012 he wrote and published Titanic Tragedy. He is the father of writer Ian Maxtone-Graham. John Maxtone-Graham died from respiratory failure in Manhattan on July 6, 2015, aged 85.

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