The Commercial Apple Industry of North America

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Macmillan, 1921 - Apple - 466 pages
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Page 203 - ... years. Frequently, good indications of the orchard's needs may be obtained in less time than this, as shown above in the Johnston and Brown orchards, but at least this amount of time should be allowed and more should be used...
Page 23 - ... the Revolution. It might be well to state that " Albemarle Pippins " draw their Virginia name from the county in which they grow to perfection, but that the variety is properly termed Yellow Newtown. It has been authentically stated that so pleased was Queen Victoria over several barrels of Albemarle Pippins presented to her during the first year of her reign by the late Arthur Stevenson. American minister to England, that she caused the import tax on apples to be removed. Since that time our...
Page 192 - Neither phosphorus nor lime, when used alone, has shown any important influence on either yield or growth in apples. Lime may often have some indirect value, however, through its favorable influence on leguminous covers i Quotations from State Coll. Bull., No. 153. or intercrops, and possibly as an accompaniment of fertilizer applications. In the latter relation its' chief effect has been on growth.
Page 7 - ... sides, not infrequently by oxen, in hundreds of wagonloads, to find their way into the commercial channels of apple trade. FUTURE OF THE APPLE INDUSTRY. Apple production does not respond quickly to supply and demand, and for this reason there has been more or less instability in the matter of prices. It requires several years for trees to come into full bearing, and overproduction as the result of excessive planting is not felt for a considerable period. There seems no reason to believe that...
Page 192 - The addition of phosphorus or potash to nitrogen applications has usually given larger returns than nitrogen alone. The nitrogen and phosphorus combination has produced an average increase over the normal yields in two experiments of 265 and 308 bushels per acre annually during 9- and 10-year periods. This combination is also proving important in one of the experiments in young orchards. In at least three of the other bearing orchards, however, the addition of phosphorus has resulted in no important...
Page 2 - ... the industry and to a brief description of the relative importance of different regions and the factors which influenced their development. In 1918, the estimated value of the total apple crop in the United States, including both commercial and noncommercial apples, was $229,990,000. Apples ranked ninth in the list of farm crops, being exceeded in total value only by wheat, oats, cotton, corn, potatoes, hay, tobacco, and barley. The total value of the apple crop was about three times that of...
Page 33 - Rhode Island Greenings. The Hudson Valley region, although of less importance than western New York, has heavy plantings and is credited with about one-fifth of the New York State production. Baldwin is the leading variety in the Hudson Valley, as elsewhere in New York. NEW ENGLAND BALDWIN BELT. Maine, New Hampshire, and Massachusetts are included in what is known as the New England Baldwin belt, so called on account of the prominence of the Baldwin variety, which makes up over half of the total...
Page 4 - LII, fig. 1.) At the present time in many parts of the United States there is scarcely a farm that does not have its little home orchard, and a great many farm orchards produce a few more apples than are needed at home. Many of these apples go to waste, but sometimes the surplus is pressed into cider, used for other by-products, or in some quantity finds its way into commercial channels during years when prices warrant. Just how great a part the last factor plays in the commercial apple industry...
Page 203 - ... other method yet known of securing reliable information on the fertility needs of a particular orchard. Without the information which such a test will furnish, one simply remains in the dark in all his fertilizing operations. TABLE V. PLAN FOR LOCAL ORCHARD-FERTILIZER TEST (Rates are indicated for a mature tree in bearing.) 1. Check (unfertilized.) 2. Nitrate of soda, 5 Ibs. 3. Nitrate, 5 Ibs.; acid phosphate, 10 Ibs. 4. Nitrate of soda, 5 Ibs.; potash, 2 Ibs. 5. Check. 6. Acid phosphate, 10...
Page 30 - ... established and has remained in western New York. One-fourth of the normal commercial apple crop of the United States is produced in the State of New York. Heaviest plantings are found in Niagara, Monroe, Orleans, and Wayne Counties; these are along the lake shore in western New York. In this region most of the present bearing acreage was planted in the late sixties and in the seventies. In other words, the average age of bearing orchards is about 40 years. In few places in this country have...

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